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Popcorn & Prejudice: A Movie Blog

Seattle Times writer Moira Macdonald muses on moviegoing. Email Moira: mmacdonald@seattletimes.com.

December 6, 2012 at 10:37 AM

Costume designers, sitting around talking

(But before we go there, note this: Barbra Streisand, supposedly, is considering Lady Gaga for the title role in “Gypsy.” This is . . . not a terrible idea? Maybe kind of great? Even though I don’t know much more of Gage than this Tony Bennett video? But we’ll see.)
Anyway. The excellent Hollywood Reporter roundtable series continues, with something new this year: a sit-down with a group of great costume designers. I have a not-so-secret fascination with costumes (best ones this year: “Anna Karenina,” fascinating because they don’t strictly adhere to the period), and am thrilled that the HR pulled together this stellar group: Colleen Atwood (“Snow White and the Huntsman”), Mark Bridges (“The Master”), Paco Delgado (“Les Miserables”), Jacqueline Durran (“Anna Karenina”), Joanna Johnston (“Lincoln”), and Julie Weiss (“Hitchcock”).
I enjoyed this photo gallery, which shows off some beautiful costume sketches, and the entire interview, particularly this passage:

Atwood: Some of the most amazing actors I’ve worked with put on their costume and don’t even look in the mirror right away. They walk around in it, and they feel the costume, and there’s something almost visceral about them sort of feeling what that is, as opposed to the conception that they’re glued to the mirror for hours on end, which maybe later in their room they are, I don’t know. Some of the most kind of glamorous, unexpected women don’t really look at themselves in the mirror. It’s also interesting that sometimes the people who haven’t got a sense of achievement as an actor are very vulnerable that way, that they look in the mirror the whole time and don’t feel anything. As a costume designer, you have to bring out the feeling that they’re OK, that they’re gonna do fine, and really support them and the journey they’re making.
Weiss: Those extraordinary actors will just stand — Robert De Niro just stands — and you watch them become that person

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