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Popcorn & Prejudice: A Movie Blog

Seattle Times writer Moira Macdonald muses on moviegoing. Email Moira: mmacdonald@seattletimes.com.

February 19, 2015 at 12:44 PM

Oscar nominees: by the numbers

As we count down to Oscar night (don’t forget: live chats here at noon Friday, and starting at 4pm on Sunday), a few stats about the Academy Award nominees:

Best Picture nominees, in order of box office:

  1. “American Sniper,” $304 million
  2. “The Imitation Game,” $80 million
  3. “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” $59 million
  4. “Selma,” $48 million
  5. “Birdman,” $36 million
  6. “The Theory of Everything,” $33 million
  7. “Boyhood,” $25 million
  8. “Whiplash,” $10 million

Title word from this list with best Oscar track record: “American,” in the title of two previous Best Picture winners (“American Beauty,” “An American in Paris”)

Highest grossing Best Picture winner of all time: “Titanic,” $659 million

Lowest grossing Best Picture winner (of the past few decades): “The Hurt Locker,” $17 million

Number of first-time nominees in the acting categories: 9 (Steve Carell, Benedict Cumberbatch, Michael Keaton, Eddie Redmayne, J.K. Simmons, Felicity Jones, Rosamund Pike, Patricia Arquette, Emma Stone)

Age range of first-time nominees: 26 (Emma Stone) to 63 (Keaton).

Oldest acting nominee this year: 84-year-old Robert Duvall, the oldest-ever nominee in supporting actor — and, if he won, would be the oldest winner of an acting Oscar in history, in any category. (He won’t win, though.)

Competing against himself: Alexandre Desplat, nominated twice in the original score category (for “Grand Budapest Hotel” and “Imitation Game”). Desplat has six previous nominations but has never won; surely he’ll be crossing his fingers Sunday night.

40 years between Oscars? Costume designer Milena Canonero won her first Academy Award in 1975, for “Barry Lyndon”; she’s favored to win again this year for “Grand Budapest Hotel.” (She also won for “Chariots of Fire” and “Marie Antoinette.”)

And then there’s Streep: Meryl Streep long ago left Katharine Hepburn and Jack Nicholson (once the record-holders for total acting nominations, with 12) in the dust. This year, she racked up her 19th nomination. That’s nothing, though, compared to composer John Williams, who has more nominations than any living person: 49. But he’s sitting out this year.

Meryl Streep, notching nomination #19 for "Into the Woods" (photo by Peter Mountain, courtesy of Walt Disney Pictures)

Meryl Streep, notching nomination #19 for “Into the Woods” (photo by Peter Mountain, courtesy of Walt Disney Pictures)

 

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