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Seattle Times coverage of pot policy, culture and lifestyle.

November 4, 2014 at 7:11 PM

Momentum for pot legalization advocates: Oregon passes, leading in Alaska, D.C. gives strong yes

Legalization advocates across the country cheered election results as pro-pot ballot measures won voters’ favor.

Voters made Oregon the third state to approve the legalization of recreational pot. The Oregonian reports nearly 54 percent of voters were approving Measure 91 in initial returns.

In Alaska, about 54 percent of voters were in favor of Ballot Measure 2, which would tax and regulate the production and sale of marijuana.

Meanwhile, in Washington, D.C., voters overwhelmingly said yes to a measure that legalizes the possession of some marijuana for personal use. Unlike the other states that legalized pot, the D.C. initiative does not set up a system for growing and selling marijuana commercially.

Even Guam made pot headlines, becoming the first first U.S. territory to approve medical marijuana.

In Maine, two cities split on measures to legalize pot. South Portland voted in favor of an ordinance making possession of small amounts of pot legal while nearby Lewiston rejected a similar measure. The vote is mostly symbolic because local police don’t plan to change enforcement, according to the Portland Press Herald.

The biggest bad news for legalization advocates: Florida. Although people overwhelmingly voted for a medical marijuana measure, it ultimately failed to garner the 60 percent needed to win approval.

Voters in Colorado also approved five local bans on pot sales, according to The Gazette.

Comments | More in News | Topics: cannabis, nation votes, pot

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