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Reel Time Fishing Northwest

Mark Yuasa covers fishing and outdoors in the Pacific Northwest.

May 30, 2009 at 10:31 AM

A Sea Change documentary comes to Seattle International Film Festival June 1

A gripping new documentary titled A Sea Change will premiere at the Seattle International Film Festival June 1 at the Egyptian Theatre, 805 East Pine St. in Seattle, and June 2 at the Kirkland Performance Center, 350 Kirkland Ave. in Kirkland.

The movie provides viewers the insight on a world without fish, and talks about ocean acidification, the underbelly of climate change, a little-known but potentially devastating threat to ocean life.

The film also has strong ties to the Seattle area that are woven into the film.

Award-winning director Barbara Ettinger and her husband co-producer Sven Huseby who was raised in Seattle and graduated from Ballard High School will have a question and answer panel after the June 1 premiere.

They will be joined on the panel by Seattle-based Professor Edward L. Miles of the University of Washington who plays a prominent role in the film and is one of the world’s leading ocean policy experts.

Also participating are two ocean scientists and an industry consultant all based in Seattle and featured in the film: Dr. Richard Feely and Dr. Christopher L. Sabine both of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) as well Brad Warren of the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership.

The story line of the movie is about Huseby, a descendant of Norwegian fishmongers and lifelong environmentalist, who had never imagined the oceans were endangered by greenhouse gas until he read a New Yorker article on ocean acidification.

That article, “The Darkening Sea” (Nov. 20, 2006, p. 66) changed his life. He discovered that the effects of climate change are not limited to global warming: they extend to the sea, where water chemistry is being changed by excess carbon dioxide, creating a profound threat to the food chain, starting with the tiny creatures at its bottom.

Huseby and Ettinger created a feature-length documentary about ocean acidification. The film was completed after two years of production, thousands of miles of travel, and hundreds of hours of editing.

Huseby’s travels took him to fishing villages in Alaska, conferences and laboratories, and to ancestral sites from the Copper River Delta to the barren glacial beaches of Svalbard, Norway. For more information go to A Sea Change Web site.

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