Follow us:

Reel Time Fishing Northwest

Mark Yuasa covers fishing and outdoors in the Pacific Northwest.

June 8, 2009 at 9:44 PM

Word on Columbia River and tributary sport fisheries, and how fish returns are shaping up

Here is the latest sport fishing news from the Columbia River and its tributaries:

Cowlitz River – Some spring chinook and steelhead are being caught. Most of the chinook were sampled near the barrier dam. Through June 3, a total of 2,301 hatchery adults (goal 1,250) and 1,002 jacks had returned to the salmon hatchery.

Kalama River – No report on steelhead angling success. Through June 3, a total of 44 adults (goal 500) and 22 jacks had returned to Kalama Falls Hatchery.

Lewis River – No report on steelhead angling success. 984 adults are on-hand including 342 from today. Goal for Lewis only production is about 1,000 fish.

Wind River – Mixture of adult and jack spring chinook are being caught in the gorge and upper river. Effort is down to just a few boats per day at the mouth.

From Charlie Cochran WDFW Technician: There have been no new detections at Bonneville of PIT tagged spring chinook from CNFH since the last update on May 28th. The total at Bonneville for the season was 82 adult and 30 jacks, producing estimates of 6,338 adult and 2,695 jack chinook from CNFH.

There have been a total of 17 tagged adult chinook from CNFH detected passing the PIT interrogation system at Shipherd Falls as of the morning of June 4, 2009. This is an increase of five tagged fish since the last download one week ago. Expanding by the CNFH tag rate produces an estimate of 1,314 which is an increase of 386 since May 28.

An additional three PIT tagged jacks were detected bringing the season total to eight for an estimate of 718 jacks from CNFH. These estimates assume a 100% interrogation efficiency at Shipherd Falls. These numbers are underestimates if the system is less than 100% efficient.

Carson National Fish Hatchery on the Wind River met its goal (1,200 fish) as of today (June 8).

Drano Lake – Anglers are still catching some spring chinook though effort is low.

Based on data from the Fish Passage Center site, 14,938 of the 934,438 (1.6%) 2006 brood Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery spring chinook were PIT tagged. Based on the DART web site, 79 Little White Salmon 2006 brood PIT tags have been detected at Bonneville Dam through June 3. Applying the 79 PIT tags detected/1.6% smolt PIT tag rate = 4,900 Little White Salmon spring chinook jacks have crossed Bonneville Dam through June 3.

Klickitat River – Some of the best fishing of the season for the Klickitat was reported last week. Combination of adult and jack spring chinook and summer run steelhead were caught. About half the chinook were chrome bright. Flows at Pitt were 2,350 cfs this morning, just above the long-term mean for this date.

A total of 5,000 PIT tags were put into the 2005 and 2006 brood spring chinook releases from Klickitat Hatchery. The total 2005 brood smolt release from Klickitat Hatchery was approximately 630,000 fish of which 0.0079% were PIT tagged. Through June 3, a total of 12 four-year-old Klickitat Hatchery PIT tags have been detected at Bonneville Dam. Using the 12 PIT tags recovered at Bonneville Dam/0.0079 smolt PIT tag rate = 1,520 Klickitat Hatchery four-year-olds have crossed Bonneville Dam to date.

From Joe Zendt Yakama Biologist: Based upon mature fish Floy tagged at Lyle Falls and recovered at the hatchery, the updated mark-recapture population estimate is 2,518 fish (95% CI: 1550 to 4493) with 93% being hatchery fish. The population estimate is subject to some change based on the proportion of tagged and untagged fish that show up at the hatchery over the next few weeks (i.e. the number won’t necessarily keep climbing).

Through June 3, a total of 120 fish had returned to the salmon hatchery; no breakdown on adults and jacks until 1st sorting later this month. Goal is 500 adults.

STURGEON

Lower Columbia from the Wauna power lines downstream – Effort continues to build with nearly 370 private and 19 charters counted during last Saturday’s (June 6) flight. Creel sampling data from the ports of Chinook and Ilwaco and the Deep River ramp should be available by tomorrow.

A total of 15,529 fish are available for 2009 fisheries below Wauna. Based on catch estimates through May, about 14,400 fish are available for harvest below Wauna for the remainder of 2009. Catch rates through May are tracking lower than in 2008.

Lower Columbia from the Wauna power lines to Marker #85 – A total of 166 boats were counted in this section during last Saturday’s flight. Boat anglers around Vancouver and from Longview downstream are catching some legals as are some bank anglers in the Longview area. About 40% of the boats were found in the gorge.

A total of 11,268 fish are available for harvest in 2009. This includes harvest in the Willamette River which is projected to be 4,450 fish above the baseline (5,675 fish total) in 2009.

The estimated harvest for the Willamette River from January 1-May 31, 2009 is 4,129 fish, which is 190 fish below the projected harvest through May and 73% of the modeled annual harvest of 5,675 fish. The estimated harvest for the mainstem Columbia River from January 1-May 31, 2009 is approximately 2,000 white sturgeon, or about twice the 2008 harvest for the same period but only 200-300 fish above the projected harvest through May.

Staff will continue to distribute weekly updates for lower Columbia sturgeon fisheries. A second update should be available by June 17, 2009.

Bonneville Pool – Catch and release only through the end of the year.

WALLEYE AND BASS

Bonneville Pool – Boat anglers averaged almost 5 bass kept/released per rod. No effort was observed for walleye.

TROUT

Mayfield Lake – Bank anglers are catching some rainbows.

Riffe Lake – Bank anglers are catching some landlocked coho.

Swofford Pond – Bank anglers are catching rainbows, bluegills, and perch.

Comments

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►