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Reel Time Fishing Northwest

Mark Yuasa covers fishing and outdoors in the Pacific Northwest.

June 21, 2010 at 11:13 AM

Westport ocean chinook fishery takes a nose dive this past weekend

The ocean hatchery-marked chinook fishery off Westport was off-the-charts last Thursday and Friday, but then slowed to a snails pace by the weekend.

“Chinook fishing was phenomenal last Wednesday to Friday with some boats limiting out, and then I don’t know what happened over the weekend,” said Larry Giese, owner of Deep Sea Charters in Westport. “It might have been the low pressure change that could have turned things around, but we do know there are some fish being caught north of us.”

The hatchery kings have averaged 12 to 20 pounds, most were 15 pounds, and a few up to 30 pounds.

Private boats heading out of Westport also found excellent fishing late last week, only to struggle by the weekend.

“It was dead over the weekend, but we are out right now (June 21) and the ocean is beautiful and calm,” said Tony Floor, director of fishing affair for the Northwest Marine Trade Association.

The commercial trollers in the same area also reported decent action and then it fell apart by the weekend.

Salmon anglers can expect this to happen as waves of fish come and go each day, but should only improve as we head into July when the bulk of salmon usually arrive off the coast.

Ilwaco was also slow over the weekend, and reports from Neah Bay weren’t much better.

All coastal ports are currently open daily through June 30 with a two-hatchery chinook daily limit. Release all coho and all wild unmarked chinook.

Then starting July 1 Ilwaco is open daily with a two-salmon daily limit of which only one may be a chinook, and release wild coho.

Westport is open July 4, and fishing is open Sundays through Thursdays only with a two-salmon daily limit of which only one may be a chinook, and release wild coho.

La Push and Neah Bay open July 1, and fishing is open Tuesdays through Saturdays only with a two-salmon daily limit of which only one may be a chinook, and release wild coho.

Anglers should check for other specific details and regulations, plus catch quotas and closures dates for each port.

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