Follow us:

Reel Time Fishing Northwest

Mark Yuasa covers fishing and outdoors in the Pacific Northwest.

October 9, 2011 at 10:53 AM

Young fish moved from the Naselle Hatchery after damage to pipe creates serious water leak

A serious water leak earlier this week prompted state hatchery workers to temporarily evacuate thousands of juvenile coho, steelhead and rainbow trout from the Naselle Hatchery in Pacific County.

Ron Warren, a state Fish and Wildlife regional fish manager said in a news release that hatchery workers reported a serious water leak Oct. 2 that could cause further damage to the 38-year-old facility.

“Hatchery workers found water rising up through the gravel and running down the driveway like a small creek,” Warren said. “Unfortunately, we can’t fix the pipe without shutting off the water to the entire facility, and we can’t do that without moving the fish.”

Since Wednesday (Oct. 5), tanker trucks have been transferring all 1.4-million juvenile coho, 50,000 steelhead smolts and 20,000 rainbow trout to state Fish and Wildlife’s Nemah Hatchery, 20 miles to the north. All of those fish are scheduled for release next spring.

“With any luck, we’ll be able to fix the pipe and return the fish to the Naselle facility in a few days,” Warren said. “We know how much those fish mean to fisheries in this area.”

The Naselle Hatchery releases the majority of coho harvested in Willapa Bay, while also rearing chinook salmon, steelhead and rainbow trout for area fisheries, Warren said.

While the young fish are being moved, approximately one million eggs taken from returning chinook salmon will remain at the Naselle Hatchery during the pipe repairs, he said.

“The eggs are too fragile to move right now,” Warren said. “We’re installing a temporary water system for them until the repairs are finished.”

Heather Bartlett, a statewide state Fish and Wildlife hatchery manager, said the Naselle facility is one of several state fish hatcheries in western Washington with main water supply lines showing clear signs of deterioration. She said state Fish and Wildlife has submitted a capital budget request to the 2012 Legislative Session to address failing pipes at state hatcheries.

“The situation at the Naselle Hatchery is a classic example of deferred maintenance,” Bartlett said. “Our state’s hatchery system generates more than $70 million in economic activity every year just from salmon and steelhead production. But without adequate funding for maintenance, we’ll put our fisheries and the benefits they provide for our state at risk.”

Comments

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►