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Reel Time Fishing Northwest

Mark Yuasa covers fishing and outdoors in the Pacific Northwest.

November 26, 2011 at 10:08 AM

Local painter depicts history and modern times of Puget Sound and Duwamish River through artwork

A new series of artwork by painter Gene Gentry McMahon will be on display at Seattle Aquarium now through Jan. 31.

“Waterwatching: Puget Sound and the Duwamish River,” serves as a visual journey through the history of the Puget Sound region from the late 18th century to current times, with a particular emphasis on Elliott Bay and the Duwamish River.

“Having lived in the Puget Sound region all my life, I have a passion for its history and a deep concern for its well-being,” McMahon said. “In my work, I am always interested in the question of how we balance civic growth and community needs with the intelligent management of our waterways. As a community, we have not always achieved that goal. But by outlining the remarkable history of the Puget Sound in ‘Waterwatching: Puget Sound and the Duwamish River,’ I hope to inspire interest in its history, pride in its beauty and diversity, and an awareness of the challenges we face in safeguarding its future.”

McMahon is a native of greater Seattle and the Pacific Northwest, receiving a Master of Fine Arts in painting from the University of Washington. Her work has been exhibited in the Seattle Art Museum, the Bellevue Art Museum, Henry Art Gallery, the Whatcom Museum of History and Art, Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Palm Springs Desert Museum, and numerous Seattle area galleries.

In addition to studio work, McMahon has created public art. The best known piece is the large mural in Metro Tunnel’s Westlake Station.

McMahon has taught and lectured throughout the Pacific Northwest at venues including the University of Washington, Cornish College of the Arts, the School of Visual Concepts, Bellevue College and Lakeside School. She is a founding member of Seattle Print Arts, and currently serves on the advisory board of On the Boards, Behnke Center for Contemporary Performance.

“Waterwatching” is funded in part by an Individual Artist Project Grant from 4Culture and a City Artist Project award from the Seattle Office of Arts and Cultural Affairs.

The Aquarium’s admission gate is open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, with the exhibits closing at 6 p.m.

Holiday hours are: Christmas Eve (Dec. 24) open 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. with exhibits closing at 4 p.m.; closed Christmas Day (Dec. 25).

Admission fees are: Adults $19; Youth age 4-12 $12; children age three and younger are admitted free. For more information, call 206-386-4300 or visit the Seattle Aquarium website.

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