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Reel Time Fishing Northwest

Mark Yuasa covers fishing and outdoors in the Pacific Northwest.

February 3, 2013 at 12:08 PM

Fisheries public meeting focuses on many proposed sportfishing rule changes

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There are some major sport fishing rule proposals on the state Fish and Wildlife Commission’s agenda at a public meeting 8:30 a.m. Feb. 8-9 in Natural Resources Building, 1111 Washington St. S.E. in Olympia.

Some of the more notable issues for coastal areas are reducing the lingcod fishing season of Neah Bay east of the Bonilla-Tatoosh Island boundary (Marine Catch Area 4B); implement a two-fish daily catch limit on tuna; adding a minimum size limit on cabezon and lingcod; and increase the spot shrimp daily limit from 80 to 200.

In the Puget Sound region proposals include adding a single-point barbless hook rule in Lake Sammamish to protect kokanee; increase angling opportunity in South Fork Nooksack River to open on first Saturday in June for catch and release fly fishing; open a selective gear rules trout fishery in the Lower Skagit River; and allowing trout retention in a section of the Quilcene River.

Other statewide proposals on the agenda are to:

Allow the use of two fishing poles, with the purchase of a two-pole endorsement, on 50 additional lakes throughout the state; remove the daily catch limit for channel catfish and the daily catch and size limits for bass and walleye in portions of the Columbia and Snake rivers and their tributaries to assist recovery efforts for salmon and steelhead; and increase catch limits for walleye on Lake Roosevelt and the Spokane Arm of Lake Roosevelt.

These are just some of the 70 proposed rules changes up for public comment.

For details, visit the state Fish and Wildlife Commission’s website.

To view all the proposed rules, go to the state Fish and Wildlife’s website.

(Photo courtesy of The Seattle Times Archive)

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