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Reel Time Fishing Northwest

Mark Yuasa covers fishing and outdoors in the Pacific Northwest.

June 4, 2013 at 4:35 PM

Local rivers opened this past Saturday to fair fishing action, and should hold up through summer

WinterfishMany local rivers and streams opened this past Saturday for salmon, steelhead or trout, and here are some reports on how fishing fared:

The Cascade River and Skagit River from the Highway 530 Bridge at Rockport to Marblemount Bridge opened for hatchery chinook this past Saturday (June 1), and the catches were good one day and bad the next.

“Sounded like it was kind of mixed bag depending on where you were at,” said Brett Barkdull, a state Fish and Wildlife biologist. “I heard they got about 10 fish or so right around the hatchery first thing in the morning on Saturday. It also sounded like down in the Skagit it wasn’t quite as good and then it kind of flip, flopped the next day (Sunday, June 2), and few more fish were caught down in the Skagit and less in the Cascade.

Barkdull said it was pretty dead on Monday (June 3).

“That is because it looks like we need more water as it is pretty low,” Barkdull said. “The good news is we’ll get water whether we like it or not. If this weather forecast holds we’ll have more water than we want (from snowmelt and runoff from the dam).”

The Marblemount Hatchery on the Cascade River had about 200 chinook through the middle of last week, and the forecast this year is 2,800 hatchery chinook, which is the highest since the fishery began.

Another popular area that opened for chinook and steelhead on Saturday is the Skykomish River.

“The Reiter Ponds section (on Upper Skykomish) opened, and I did hear one story about a person catching their two-fish limit within ½-hour there,” said Aaron Bosworth, a state Fish and Wildlife biologist. “I also heard that people fishing (summer-run steelhead) out on the main part of the (Skykomish) did well also. That fishery attracted quite a crowd the way it usually does.”

The chinook fishery on the Skykomish generated some effort, but Bosworth didn’t hear of any reports.

Bosworth says there were several folks out on the Cedar River, and heard that a couple people had caught some nice-sized trout (18 to 20 inches) in this catch-and-release fishery.

“There were also several boats out on the Green River after summer steelhead,” Bosworth said. “Success was moderate there, and I heard that three boats fishing between Flaming Geyser and Soos Creek caught one fish per boat on Saturday.”

(Photo by Mark Harrison, Seattle Times staff photographer)

 

 

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