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Reel Time Fishing Northwest

Mark Yuasa covers fishing and outdoors in the Pacific Northwest.

June 28, 2013 at 3:25 PM

More strange fish tracked in the Columbia River

Bradford Island Fish 062613

(Photo courtesy of state Fish and Wildlife, and pictured is a possible striped bass at Bonneville Dam.)

Joe Hymer, a state Fish and Wildlife biologist in Vancouver reported more strange fish were seen in the Columbia River this week.

Hymer says a striped bass was seen going through Bradford Island count station at Bonneville Dam, and another was found dead on the shorelines this past week.

“One of our samplers saw a dead striped bass, approximately 15 pounds, on a mainstem Columbia beach near Lyons Park at Woodland last Saturday (June 22),” said Hymer.

These are on top of a 52 pounder caught June 17 in the Lower Columbia by a commercial fisherman.

It was caught by a commercial fisherman in the Gorge.  It had nearly 10 pounds of eggs but also an empty stomach.

The striped bass was caught in a gill-net boat run by Jason Lake from the Lynnwood area according to Mike Chamberlain, owner of Ted’s Sporting Goods in Lynnwood. Lake was fishing in the Bridal Veil area of the Columbia between Bonneville and gorge mouth.

Striper bass are caught in the northern California region, but fcatches this far north are rarely seen.

IMAGE

(Photo courtesy of state Fish and Wildlife, and is a chum salmon caught by a tribal fisherman below John Day Dam.)

A story I ran in early July of 2008 confirmed a 40-pound striped bass was caught in the gorge, and another catch around that time had also occurred down toward Deep River on the Washington side. There were also reports of a striped bass caught in Puget Sound at Holmes Harbor in 1968.

Another strange fish to arrive in the Columbia was a pink salmon, and an early arriving chum.

There is no documented pinks runs in the Columbia River, and are likely wayward fish that were headed to the Puget Sound region.

This summer a huge run of more than six-million pinks  are expected to flood into Puget Sound and another 8.9-million were expected to return to the Fraser River in southern British Columbia.

The first pink of the year was counted at Bonneville Dam on June 24, and the pink pictured was recently caught off the tribal scaffolds below John Day Dam.

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