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Reel Time Fishing Northwest

Mark Yuasa covers fishing and outdoors in the Pacific Northwest.

February 14, 2014 at 9:40 AM

Columbia River fall chinook return could be the largest since 1938

State Fish and Wildlife sent out the fall chinook return for this year and with more than 1.6-million forecasted on top of another 1.2-million coho, which may lead to some outstanding fishing in the ocean and in-river this coming summer!

Here is the report that came out this morning:

In addition to nearly a million Columbia River coho swimming in the ocean, 1.6 million fall Chinook are expected to the Columbia River in 2014, the largest return since at least 1938!

Nearly 1 million of those Chinook are expected to be upriver brights of which 2/3 will be four-year-olds.  This year’s forecasted run is over 25% larger than the 2013 actual return.  Last year’s actual return came in nearly twice as large as the preseason forecast. 

COLUMBIA RIVER FALL CHINOOK

2013 Forecast/Actual Returns and 2014 Preseason Forecasts

 

2013

2014

Stock Group

February Forecasts

Actual Returns

February Forecasts

Lower River Hatchery – LRH

88,000

103,200

110,000

Lower River Wild – LRW

14,200

25,800

34,200

Bonneville Pool Hatchery – BPH

38,000

86,600

115,100

Upriver Bright – URB

432,500

784,100

973,300

Bonneville Upriver Bright – BUB

35,200

35,600

49,500

Pool Upriver Bright – PUB

70,000

207,800

310,600

Select Area Bright – SAB

9,000

23,300

10,200

Columbia River Total

686,900

1,266,400

1,602,900

2014 Forecasts

LRH – Similar to the 5-year average (95,500) and 2013 actual return.

LRW – Largest return since 1989.  More than double the 10-year average (13,600).

BPH – About 40% greater than the 10-year average (80,700).

URB – Nearly 1 million fish…..

BUB – About 35% greater than 10-year average (36,500).

PUB – Record high forecasted return.  Highest actual return on record was 207,800 in 2013.

The total forecast of 1,602,900 Columbia River fall Chinook would be the largest return on record since 1938.

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