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Reel Time Fishing Northwest

Mark Yuasa covers fishing and outdoors in the Pacific Northwest.

August 20, 2014 at 4:23 PM

Ocean salmon fishery going strong with decent catches of kings and coho

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(Ben Moos of Pullman with a nice king he caught at Buoy-10 off Ilwaco on Aug. 17. Photo courtesy of Tony Floor.)

The ocean salmon fishery continues remains very good along the entire 157 miles of coastline.

“The Ilwaco area is back to (two-salmon daily) limits on Tuesday, and we did see a little drop in the success right before that due to bad weather,” said Wendy Beeghly, a state Fish and Wildlife biologist. “The catch at Ilwaco is still mostly coho averaging 7 to 8 pounds with some up 12 pounds and larger.”

Ilwaco anglers this past week averaged 1.4 salmon per rod, and 0.2 on chinook and 1.2 for coho.

Just up the coast at Westport the catch average increased to 1.5 per rod with 0.4 on chinook and 1.1 on coho.

“They had a good week at Westport, and still some pretty good fishing,” Beeghly said.

Most of the charter fishing fleet was fishing about 20 miles offshore along the 300 foot line. The smaller boats were doing well off the beach just north of Ocean Shores. Daily limit at Westport is now two kings.

To the north, La Push anglers averaged 1.4 fish per rod, and the bulk of the catch was coho. At Neah Bay, it was 0.9 fish per rod, and the average was 0.2 for chinook and 0.7 for coho.

The effort and catch at the Buoy 10 salmon fishery on the Lower Columbia River mouth has amped up in recent days.

“There is tons of fishing pressure and tons of boats at Buoy-10, and I just looked at (Tuesday’s) data which was 0.3 average per rod on chinook and 0.4 on coho,” Beeghly said. “On Tuesday we saw more than 700 boats out on the water, and that was split between the ocean and river.”

A check from the weekend showed: 120 boats with 370 anglers Saturday caught 139 chinook and 59 hatchery coho; and 136 with 371 Sunday caught 99 and 62.

Wait lines at the boat ramps on the Washington and Oregon sides below the Astoria-Megler Bridge were taking some 1.5 hours to launch their craft into the water.

The tuna fishing coastwide also is still going strong.

“Tuna fishermen are still doing well everywhere” Beeghly said. “I’ve been hearing they’re going out a little further like about 40 to 45 miles at least down at the southern ports.”

 

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