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January 28, 2014 at 3:36 PM

Michael Irvin with an interesting comment on Russell Wilson

Hall of Fame receiver Michael Irvin had an interesting take on Russell Wilson and the idea of a new wave of dual-threat quarterbacks taking over the NFL.

“Russell is a little ahead of what we consider new school,” Irvin said. “New-school guys are considered talented shoulder down basically. They can win with their arm or their legs. Old-school guys are those Peyton Manning thinkers. Russell Wilson’s gift is that he’s new school shoulders down but old school shoulders up. That’s why he is in this game.

“When the rest of these quarterbacks — the Cam Newtons, the RGIIIs, the Colin Kaepernicks — when these guys who are gifted like Russell shoulders down start playing the game like he plays it shoulders up, this league will be a whole different monster,” Irvin continued. “I call him a managing playmaker. If you can be a managing playmaker, that means I have the ability to run the ball and break out of here and make plays with my legs, but I choose not to until I have to? That’s a dangerous player because he keeps the field open at all times until the last moment.”

Seahawks general manager John Schneider talked about the much-discussed end to Wilson’s season, when his numbers dropped off from levels that had him in consideration for the MVP at one point.

“You saw his numbers come down a little bit towards the end of the season,” he said. “We played a lot of very good defenses. That was a little bit more of a result of him really protecting the ball. A lot of throw-aways. He doesn’t care about his passer rating…He really has a lot of that cornerback mentality to him. If he makes a mistake, he can put it out of his mind right away and move on to the next play.”

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