Follow us:

Seahawks Blog

The latest news and analysis from all angles on the Seahawks.

May 4, 2014 at 1:04 PM

Counting down the Top 25 Seahawks Draft Picks: No. 6 — S Kenny Easley

easley

SAFETY KENNY EASLEY

WHEN DRAFTED: 1981, first round, fourth overall

COLLEGE: UCLA

SEAHAWKS CAREER: 1981-87

WHY HE’S ON THE LIST: Easley’s inclusion — like everybody the rest of the ones we will reveal — doesn’t need much explaining.

The Seahawks allowed 408 points in 1980, the most in the AFC, and needed defensive help wherever they could get it.

Easley, who was a three-time consensus All-American at UCLA and finished ninth in the Heisman balloting in 1980, was taken by the Seahawks No.4 overall and didn’t disappoint, eventually earning five Pro Bowl appearances and being named the NFL Defensive Player of the Year when Seattle went 12-4 in 1984.

Injuries, though, then began to hit and Easley missed 13 games over the next three seasons before the somewhat messy ending to his Seattle career — a trade to Phoenix and then a kidney ailment that caused him to stop playing football at the age of 29.

The shortness of Easley’s career likely means the NFL Hall of Fame won’t come calling.

But while he played, he certainly was at that level, part of a 1981 draft class that yielded six Hall of Famers — the second-most since the 1960s — five of whom played defense (Lawrence Taylor, Ronnie Lott, Mike Singletary, Howie Long and Rickey Jackson).

Lott was taken four spots after Easley at No. 8 by the 49ers. ESPN’s Mike Sando a few years ago noted that the two were so closely linked on draft day that an airline ticket counter mixed up Lott’s destination, assuming he was going to Seattle. While Easley played, though, no one debated Seattle’s choice of Easley instead of Lott.

Easley, who led the NFL with 10 interceptions in 1984, was inducted into Seattle’s Ring of Honor in 2002.

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►