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December 7, 2014 at 7:01 PM

The 4 biggest moments from the Seahawks’ 24-14 win over the Eagles

The Seahawks had absolute control of this game, posting a franchise-record 41:56 time of possession and squelching Philadelphia’s usually spry offense.

It was a game that featured a dominant defensive performance, as Larry Stone writes, and one in which the younger players appeared to be coming into their own, which Jayson Jenks covered in his story.

Below, in chronological order, the four moments that defined the game:

 

Dropped punt snap leads to Eagles’ first TD

Late in first quarter

Jon Ryan, otherwise one of the best punters in the league, has now dropped a snap two weeks in a row — and this time, he couldn’t recover.

Seahawks punter Jon Ryan fumbles the punt and is tackled by Eagles linebacker Marcus Smith II during the first half. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)

Seahawks punter Jon Ryan fumbles the snap and is tackled by Eagles linebacker Marcus Smith II during the first half. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times) | More photos

Philadelphia tight end Zach Ertz got a hold of it and ran it back to the Seattle 14. The resulting drive ended in a 1-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Mark Sanchez to wide receiver Jeremy Maclin, giving the Eagles the first score of the game. It was not the best day for the special teams, as reflected in Bob Condotta’s Grading the Game, but the Seahawks managed to recover from this early mishap.

Eagles wide receiver Jeremy Maclin makes a touchdown during the first half on a pass from Eagles quarterback Mark Sanchez for the first score of the game. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)

Eagles wide receiver Jeremy Maclin scores a touchdown during the first half on a pass from Eagles quarterback Mark Sanchez for the first score of the game. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times) | More photos

 

Wilson rushes to tie it up

Early in second quarter

Capping a 10-play, 82-yard drive, Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson faked a handoff to running back Marshawn Lynch. The Eagles defense bought it, leaving Wilson free to trot into the end zone and put Seattle on the board.

Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson keeps the ball and runs it 26 yards for a touchdown against the Philadelphia Eagles in the first half. (Photo by John Lok / The Seattle Times)

Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson keeps the ball and runs it 26 yards for a touchdown against the Philadelphia Eagles in the first half. (Photo by John Lok / The Seattle Times) | More photos

 

Thomas fumble recovery leads to Lynch TD

Early in third quarter

Eagles running back LeSean McCoy fumbled on the first play from scrimmage in the second half (with help from Seahawks linebacker K.J. Wright). Seahawks safety Earl Thomas recovered at the Philadelphia 19.

The Seahawks offense took advantage of the opportunity, scoring in only two plays, with Lynch catching a pass from Wilson inside the 10 and running it in for a touchdown. Within the first minute of the second half, Seattle was up 17-7.

It was a sequence that encapsulated how in sync the offense and defense were on Sunday, which Condotta covered in his story.

Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch scores a touchdown against Philadelphia Eagles safety Nate Allen in the opening minutes of the third quarter. (Photo by John Lok / The Seattle Times)

Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch scores a touchdown against the defense of Philadelphia Eagles safety Nate Allen in the opening minutes of the third quarter. (Photo by John Lok / The Seattle Times) | More photos

 

Seahawks answer Eagles TD with one of their own

Middle of third quarter

It was a busy third quarter, with Philadelphia scoring only a few minutes after Lynch’s touchdown, bringing the score to 17-14. But the Eagles would never get closer.

The Seahawks marched downfield from their own 9-yard line in six plays, and Wilson sailed a 23-yard pass into the arms of wide receiver Doug Baldwin in the end zone. That touchdown brought Baldwin to his second-highest receiving total this season (97 yards) and the scoreboard to its final state (24-14).

Read about how Baldwin could see this touchdown unfolding even before the ball was snapped, along with how he fared with fielding punts, in our Seahawks notebook.

Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Doug Baldwin brings in a catch for a touchdown against the defense of Philadelphia Eagles' Bradley Fletcher, left, and Malcolm Jenkins in the second half. (Photo by John Lok / The Seattle Times)

Seahawks wide receiver Doug Baldwin brings in a catch for a touchdown against the defense of Eagles cornerback Bradley Fletcher, left, and safety Malcolm Jenkins, right, in the second half. (Photo by John Lok / The Seattle Times) | More photos

 

What did you think was the biggest moment of the game? Did we miss any?

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