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January 18, 2015 at 9:10 PM

The 9 biggest moments from the Seahawks’ comeback win over the Packers in the NFC Championship Game

With a little more than two minutes left in the NFC Championship Game, the Seattle Seahawks trailed the Green Bay Packers, 19-7. Cheeseheads everywhere must have thought they had a trip to Glendale in the bag.

But then, the Seahawks started playing like the Seahawks.

Despite interceptions, injuries and incredible odds, Seattle scored two touchdowns in 44 seconds and made a 2-point conversion to snatch the lead from the Packers. A Green Bay field goal sent the game into overtime, but with one more touchdown, the Seahawks stamped their tickets to their second Super Bowl in a row.

Below, the nine biggest moments from Seattle’s record comeback:

 

Sherman INT thwarts Green Bay’s opening drive

Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman showed Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers early on what happens when you throw his way.

After the opening kickoff, Green Bay had marched to the Seattle 29-yard line on a combination of running back Eddie Lacy’s legs and Seahawks penalties. It was third and 10.

Sherman, whom Rodgers didn’t test once in the teams’ last meeting, picked off a pass intended for Packers wide receiver Davante Adams — in the same corner of the same end zone where he made “The Tip” in last year’s NFC Championship Game.

Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman intercepts a pass intended for Packers wide receiver Davante Adams during the first quarter. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)

Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman intercepts a pass intended for Packers wide receiver Davante Adams during the first quarter. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times) | More photos

Richard Sherman celebrates his end zone interception on the Packers' opening drive. (Photo by Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times)

Richard Sherman celebrates his end-zone interception on the Packers’ opening drive. (Photo by Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times) | More photos

 

Green Bay held to two field goals to start

On their first two scoring drives, the Packers looked destined for the end zone — with one run even being called a touchdown before being overturned on review — but the Seahawks’ defense staved them off near the goal line each time.

One started with the first of many Packers picks, as Green Bay safety Ha Ha Clinton-Dix intercepted a pass meant for Jermaine Kearse. The next few plays got the Packers as far as the 1-yard line, but the tough Seattle run defense just couldn’t be overcome.

Packers fullback John Kuhn (30) is stopped near the goal line during the first quarter. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times) | More photos

Packers fullback John Kuhn (30) is stopped near the goal line during the first quarter. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times) | More photos

The next began with another Seattle mistake: Seahawks receiver Doug Baldwin fumbled a kickoff return at his team’s 22, and Packers safety Morgan Burnett recovered the ball.

Packers cornerback Jarrett Bush (24) celebrates a turnover after Seahawks wide receiver Doug Baldwin fumbles during the first half. (Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)

Packers cornerback Jarrett Bush (24) celebrates a turnover after Seahawks wide receiver Doug Baldwin fumbles during the first half. (Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times) | More photos

But again, the Seattle defense came through, holding Green Bay to its second field goal.

Seahawks safety Earl Thomas and the Seahawks defense combine to stop Packers running back Eddie Lacy at the goal line during the first quarter. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)

Seahawks safety Earl Thomas and the Seahawks defense combine to stop Packers running back Eddie Lacy at the goal line during the first quarter. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times) | More photos

 

Packers find end zone to widen lead

With a ton of time in the pocket, Aaron Rodgers spotted Packers receiver Randall Cobb in the end zone and fired off a touchdown pass to cap a seven-play, 56-yard drive at the end of the first quarter.

Packers wide receiver Randall Cobb scores a 13-yard touchdown during the first quarter. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)

Packers wide receiver Randall Cobb scores on a 13-yard touchdown pass during the first quarter. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times) | More photos

Green Bay finished the first quarter up 13-0, after outgaining the Seahawks 137 yards to 3. Seattle had the ball for only 2:22 of the quarter.

 

Seahawks’ vaunted secondary gets banged up

Two plays before the Packers’ second field goal in the first quarter, Seahawks safety Earl Thomas injured his shoulder making a tackle. He had to be talked into going to the locker room, and he returned to the game not long after.

Seahawks safety Earl Thomas heads to the locker room after injuring his shoulder during the second quarter.  (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)

Seahawks safety Earl Thomas heads to the locker room after injuring his shoulder during the second quarter. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times) | More photos

Late in the game, Richard Sherman injured his left arm and could be seen folding it against his chest like a bird wing whenever he wasn’t using it to defend receivers. He stayed on the field, though.

 

Seattle fakes a field goal, gets TD instead

A stalled Seahawks drive late in the third quarter looked to be ending in a 38-yard field goal attempt. But Seattle refused to settle for that.

Instead of positioning the ball for Steven Hauschka to kick, holder Jon Ryan popped up, rolled to his left and lofted it to offensive tackle Garry Gilliam in the end zone.

Seahawks punter Jon Ryan throws a touchdown pass to offensive lineman Garry Gilliam on a fake field goal play in the third quarter. (Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)

Seahawks punter Jon Ryan throws a touchdown pass to offensive lineman Garry Gilliam on a fake field goal play in the third quarter. (Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times) | More photos

Seahawks tight end Luke Willson, left, celebrates Seahawks offensive lineman Garry Gilliam’s touchdown catch on a fake field goal play in third quarter. (Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)

Seahawks tight end Luke Willson, left, celebrates Seahawks offensive lineman Garry Gilliam’s touchdown catch on a fake field goal play in third quarter. (Photo by Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times) | More photos

That play gave Seattle its first points of the day and Ryan a better passer rating than quarterback Russell Wilson.

Ryan, by the way, was cut by the Packers in 2008.

 

Lynch TD called back, then Wilson runs one in himself

During a seven-play, 69-yard drive, it looked as though Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch had delivered another of his signature Beast Mode runs, but an official review showed the side of his foot going just slightly out of bounds.

Still, the ball was placed close enough to the goal line that Seattle was able to score anyway on the legs of its mobile quarterback, Russell Wilson.

Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson rushes 1 yard for a touchdown, cutting Green Bay's lead to 5, during the fourth quarter. (Photo by Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times)

Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson rushes 1 yard for a touchdown, cutting Green Bay’s lead to 19-14, during the fourth quarter. (Photo by Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times) | More photos

 

Lynch scores go-ahead TD, with Wilson-to-Willson 2-point conversion

After Wilson’s touchdown, the Seahawks somehow recovered the onside kick and drove 50 yards in four plays. Nearly half that yardage came on another Beast Mode run — good for 24 yards, and this time, the touchdown stuck.

It was the Seahawks’ second touchdown in 44 seconds.

Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Chris Matthews recovers an onside kick during the second half. (Photo by David J. Phillip / AP)

Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Chris Matthews recovers an onside kick during the second half. (Photo by David J. Phillip / AP) | More photos

Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch scores a 24-yard touchdown during the fourth quarter that pushed the Seahawks ahead of the Packers for the first time of the game. (Photo by Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times)

Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch scores a 24-yard touchdown during the fourth quarter that pushed the Seahawks ahead of the Packers for the first time of the game. (Photo by Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times) | More photos

Lynch gave the football to his mom in the stands after he scored:

Jan. 18, 2015: Marshawn Lynch’s mom rips off her rain poncho in celebration and Lynch hands her the football from his go-ahead touchdown during the NFC championship game against the Green Bay Packers. (Lauren Frohne / The Seattle Times)

Needing a three-point cushion with the game almost over, the Seahawks went for a 2-point conversion, with Russell Wilson connecting with tight end Luke Willson.

Seahawks tight end Luke Willson scores a two-point conversion in the fourth quarter to widen Seattle's lead to three points. (Photo by Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times)

Seahawks tight end Luke Willson scores on a two-point conversion in the fourth quarter to widen Seattle’s lead to three points. (Photo by Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times) | More photos

 

Green Bay FG ties it up with 14 seconds left

The Packers weren’t going to give up that easy. They took the next 1:11 to drive 48 yards and hit a 48-yard field goal, tying the score at 22-22 to send the game into overtime.

The Seahawks fail to block a 48-yard field goal by Packers kicker Mason Crosby that tied the game in the fourth quarter and sent it into overtime. (Photo by Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times)

The Seahawks fail to block a 48-yard field goal by Packers kicker Mason Crosby that tied the score in the fourth quarter and sent it into overtime. (Photo by Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times) | More photos

 

Kearse catches winning TD in overtime

He missed catch after catch during regulation, but Seahawks wide receiver Jermaine Kearse pulled in the one that mattered most.

Seattle won the coin toss to get the ball first, and they didn’t waste the opportunity. On the first drive of overtime, Russell Wilson hit wide receiver Doug Baldwin with a 35-yard pass, then Kearse with another 35-yarder in the end zone.

Seahawks wide receiver Jermaine Kearse pulls in the game-winning touchdown with Packers cornerback Tramon Williams defending. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times)

Seahawks wide receiver Jermaine Kearse pulls in the game-winning touchdown with Packers cornerback Tramon Williams defending. (Photo by Bettina Hansen / The Seattle Times) | More photos

Fans weep, players hug, Russell Wilson cries. Experience the final moments of the Seahawks’ NFC Championship win and celebration as they head to the 2015 Super Bowl. Video by Corinne Chin, Katie G. Cotterill, Lauren Frohne / The Seattle Times

 

| Topics: Doug Baldwin, Earl Thomas, Garry Gilliam

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