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The Seattle Sketcher

An illustrated journal of life in the Puget Sound region by Times artist Gabriel Campanario.

June 27, 2014 at 6:52 PM

Long wait for new bridge is over, South Park to party

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Sketched June, 24, 2014

Four years ago, the South Park neighborhood lost an important link to the rest of Seattle when its aging bridge over the Duwamish River was closed for safety reasons. Residents were angry and business owners worried about their future: “Please, don’t let the bridge close,” read a big sign of protest that I sketched back then.

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Comments | More in Community, Construction | Topics: South Park

June 20, 2014 at 11:16 PM

An extreme low tide brings out high interest and new discoveries

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Sketched June 14, 2014

low tide sealife comboAn excursion to the Puget Sound shoreline never disappoints, especially during the extreme low tides that usually happen around the summer and winter solstice.

In Edmonds, the tide reached its lowest point of the year, minus 2.98 feet, last Saturday at 12:21 p.m. That was so low that people could sneak in under the ferry dock, a rarely accessible area where the waterline would rise 15 feet by 7:45 p.m. and reach almost to the top of the pilings seen in my sketch.

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Comments | More in Nature, Recreation, Waterscapes | Topics: Edmonds

June 13, 2014 at 5:42 PM

How you can get your share of solar energy

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Sketched June 10, 2014

If it were up to Gina Hicks, more rooftops would be covered with solar panels like the picnic shelters at Jefferson Park.

Hicks is one of a few hundred Seattle City Light customers with a stake in Community Solar, a little-known program that allows customers to invest in solar energy without having to install solar panels directly on their homes. It works like this: You buy a share of the power capacity of city-owned solar arrays and get credited for the energy they produce every year.

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Comments | More in Parks | Topics: Beacon Hill

May 23, 2014 at 6:37 PM

A master of making art from old vacuums

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Will Flannery can transform your grandmother’s old Hoover into a piece of art.

Sketched May 20, 2014

Hoarders like me always have an excuse to avoid spring cleaning. Why not make something out of all that junk in the garage instead of throwing it away?

Vacuum repairman Will Flannery proves my point. He recycles old parts from machines he can’t fix and turns them into art. While he worked at the Vac Shop in Georgetown years ago, he created eye-catching works still on display outside the shop. You can’t drive along 4th Avenue South without noticing the uncanny Groucho Marx or Rudolph the Red-nosed Reindeer — all made out of unusable vacuums people dropped off or traded in.

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Comments | More in Portraits | Topics: Bothell, Georgetown

May 16, 2014 at 9:43 PM

Olympic Sculpture Park stands tall on a sunny day

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Sketched May 13, 2014

Did you get out and enjoy the sun this week? With temperatures in the 70s and 80s, it felt just like summer. Sitting by Alexander Calder’s “Eagle” at Olympic Sculpture Park, I saw people reading books, walking their dogs and taking in the magnificent views of the Olympic Mountains.

The park feels so right in this location, it’s hard to believe it didn’t exist when I moved here eight years ago. It opened in 2007 on the former site of a fuel-storage facility that took years to clean up.

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Comments | More in Nature, Parks, Skylines, Waterscapes | Topics: Belltown

May 9, 2014 at 8:41 PM

Mother’s Day plant sale recalls Shoreline mom’s gardening legacy

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“Wood Wave” is a 10-foot-tall salvaged redwood repurposed as a climbable art piece by sculptor Bruce Johnson. Enid Kruckeberg said it’s the largest public art in the City of Shoreline. (Yes, larger than the Ponies!)

Sketched May 6, 2014

Gabi_0509_kruckeberg_01Here’s a unique place I would take my mom for Mother’s Day if she didn’t live on another continent: The Kruckeberg Botanic Garden in Shoreline.

Mareen and Art Kruckeberg, a local horticulturist-botanist couple, moved to this 4-acre property in 1958 and transformed their grassy backyard into a world-class garden home to more than 2,000 plant species and some cool art installations.

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Comments | More in History, Nature, Parks, Portraits, Public art | Topics: Shoreline

May 2, 2014 at 7:22 PM

Tough tugs, big cargo and very long trips all the way to Alaska

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Sketched April 23, 2014

For those who work in the local maritime industry, boating season doesn’t start today. It’s a year-round occupation.

Once every three weeks, for example, Capt. Brent Bierbaum and the crew of the Arctic Titan load up their tugboat with food provisions and embark on a 1,400-mile journey to Alaska. The job: to transport a barge the size of a football field all the way to Whittier, a rail-yard outpost on Prince William Sound. From oil-train cars and refrigerated containers with frozen bread to machinery and even boats, the barge’s deck is packed five-stories high. Imagine maneuvering that load through tides and narrow inlets along the coast of Canada. “It’s a huge responsibility,” Bierbaum said.

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Comments | More in Boats, Waterscapes | Topics: Ballard, Elliott Bay

April 25, 2014 at 7:15 PM

In the land of the proud WSU cougar, first-time visitor finds a lot to root for

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Sketched April 19 and 20, 2014

It took me eight years, but I finally set foot in Eastern Washington. That part of the state felt like a peaceful and beautiful place to live, though not “evergreen” at all.

From the campus of Washington State University atop College Hill in Pullman, I admired an expansive view of rolling hills and vast blue skies that reminded me a bit of southwestern Spain.

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Comments | More in History, Statues | Topics: Pullman

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