Follow us:

Sounders FC

Daily coverage of Seattle Sounders FC, MLS and world soccer.

January 17, 2013 at 3:48 PM

Sounders take Brown left back Dylan Remick in second round of MLS SuperDraft

remick.jpgSounders FC coach Sigi Schmid mentioned multiple times — at an end-of-the-year press conference and during Thursday’s MLS SuperDraft — that the team was looking to get younger at left back.

To that end, Seattle drafted Dylan Remick out of Brown University to fill that role.

Remick, 21, is 6-foot, 165 pounds. He was a All-Ivy League first-team selection the past three years and an NSCAA second-team All-American in 2012 (the first Brown All-American since Jeff Larentowicz).

He also ran track and, according to the draft broadcast, is fast.

More to come from Remick’s conference call in a bit, but he said he was a biology major at Brown and had designs on becoming a doctor before committing to a soccer career (he could still become one afterward).

The Sounders rated Remick as the best left back in the draft.

More to come…

UPDATE 3:48 p.m. — A full transcript of our conference call with Dylan Remick, including an explanation of listening to Taylor Swift before games, after the jump.

* * *

* * *

DYLAN REMICK

(How does it feel to be a Sounder and what are you like as a player?) “It’s an absolute honor and privilege to be part of the Sounders organization. Watching (the draft) online, I was so thrilled and thankful that the Seattle Sounders organization chose me with their draft selection. I’m humbled and honored by that. I’m a left back, originally from Chicago, Ill. I played my four years at Brown University up in the Northeast. Other than that, just looking forward to continuing to improve my position and skills with the Sounders organization.”

(We’ve heard you described as an athletic player…) “Yeah, I think I’m a very athletic player. I think I use my endurance really well; I like to get up and down the line. I really like to get into the attack from the outside back position, but I grew up as a center back, so I also take pride in my ability to try and defend. I like the 1v1 defending battles just as much as the attacking battles, which sometimes you don’t see in a fullback, so I pride myself on that, as well. I like to get into all aspects of the game. I really like using my pace, as well. I ran track in high school — my brother runs track in college — so I try and use that, as well, getting into the attack and beating players one-on-one and also using that as an advantage in defense.”

(What was today like? And did you ever think you might not get drafted?) “Today was filled with emotions. My dad and I were watching the entire SuperDraft, so it’s just all emotions and nerves and excitement throughout the day. Once I heard my name, I just felt so much joy and happiness, humbleness, and thanks for the Seattle Sounders organization for drafting me. There always a little doubt that you’re not going to get drafted, but I had my interview with the Seattle Sounders organization at the MLS combine and it went very, very well, so I knew there was some hope in their pick being me. You never know for certain, so when I heard my name I was absolutely humbled and absolutely thrilled to (start) my Sounders career and be a part of this organization.”

(What was your major? And as an Ivy League graduate, what do you hope to do with life in addition to soccer?) “I majored in biology at Brown University. When I came to Brown I had thoughts of becoming a doctor, and that’s still in the back of my mind as something I could potentially do after soccer. But soccer was always my passion, was always my love, so I wanted to give that 100-percent focus. As I got older, in my junior and senior years, when being able to play pro became more of an option and more of a realistic goal, I sort of put all others areas of interest behind and decided to go 100-percent in trying to become a professional soccer player.”

(What was the competition like at the Sounders combine in Las Vegas and did you pick up on any interest then?) “The Las Vegas combine was an amazing experience. I thought the competition was very good. I was lucky enough to go with another Brown teammate, so that made it a little bit easier to play and get settled in. But there were a lot of guys from that Las Vegas combine at the MLS combine, so that sort of gives you a little hint at how good the competition was. I talked to some of the Seattle coaches after that and … there was definitely some interest in me in terms of playing for that organization. After I got the indication that I would be able to participate in the MLS Combine, because I was a late addition, I knew that it was just another chance that I could go out and show the Seattle Sounders organization and the coaching staff what I could do, and hopefully that was enough with the Las Vegas combine to help get me drafted.”

(What’s Ivy League soccer like and how do you think it prepared you for MLS?) “The league is definitely a different style of play. I think it helps me differently than most people in the intellectual aspect of the game. There are a lot of smart kids in the Ivy League, so both the coaches and the players take pride in trying to outthink a different player before we even step on the field. That’s an area that I believe I have improved on dramatically. I don’t know if I’d be able to get that sort of experience from another league. Also, I believe it’s a very physical league, which I think is going to help me a lot in MLS. It’s a bone-bruising league. I would say the technique as a whole is not (as) great as some of the powerhouse leagues like the ACC and the Big East, but the determination and the competitive spirit at the Ivy League really helped me in terms of growing as a soccer player. And it helped me a lot in being an underdog when you play all these big teams. It sort of mentally prepares you for both the college game and the MLS game as I head into it.”

(Your player profile on the league website says you like to listen to Taylor Swift before games. Do you want to defend yourself there?) “No, that is fair game. Yeah, I do like to listen to Taylor Swift before games. I’ve liked her since I was a sophomore in high school, when she came out with her first single. But actually for me, it sort of calms me down before games, sort of just mellows me out and gets me prepared for the game. It’s something I started as a sophomore in high school and just listening to the music, not only is it her voice, but it’s also just the memories and knowing where I can from and knowing what I did to get to this point. So it’s sort of just become a tradition to sort of forget about everything, just go out and have fun and play.”

(Did you ever cross paths with Sounders FC’s other Ivy League draft pick Mike Fucito?) “No, I can’t say I have. Sorry.”

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►