Follow us:

Soundposts

A blog for Seattle music lovers of all stripes, from hip-hop and indie rock to jazz and world music.

July 27, 2013 at 10:04 AM

Timber! gets off to family-friendly start Friday

pablotrucker

Pablo Trucker’s Brian Wagner shreds during the band’s set at Timber! Outdoor Music Festival Friday evening. Photo by Owen R. Smith.

Lost amid the crush of 100 bands descending on Capitol Hill this weekend is Timber! Outdoor Music Festival, an entirely different sort of affair for those looking for a change of pace from the bustle of urban life.

Driving out to the tiny town of Carnation, Wash., population 1,823, it’s easy to feel the stress of the city leave your body. By the time you pass Remlinger Farms, you’re in another place altogether: pastoral, calm, beautiful.

There might not be a more suitable venue for an outdoor music festival than King County’s Tolt MacDonald Park, a hidden jewel that many urbanites might never take time to visit. It’s nestled in a grove of ancient, towering evergreen trees and accessible to festival-goers only by a swinging suspension bridge spanning the Snoqualmie River that sways tenuously when more than a couple folks are on it.

It’s not that the music didn’t matter Friday night. Things got off to a little bit of a late start and bands played out of order, but for a festival in its inaugural run, those small hiccups are more than excusable.

Pablo Trucker got things steadied out with a powerful collection of moving lo-fi rock tunes and even though they played a long set, many in the crowd begged for more. It was apparent that for a lot of people, Friday was their first introduction to the band.

Turning people on to new music is kind of the point of Timber!, according to organizer Kevin Sur. The other goal is to bring people and their families closer to nature.

And boy, were there some families out. Younger folks made their presence known, but the very noticeable predominant festival population was aging hipster parents and their young children.

It made for a gleeful if somewhat chaotic time, with most of the kids under five years old. Some, like a group of young girls, stood entranced by the reedy, staccato vocals of Jenn Ghetto, performing with a full band as S. Others ignored Avian Alight’s delicate guitar strums and ethereal melodies and simply raced around the grassy main festival area screaming and laughing, their parents grateful to have a space for them to burn off energy.

Tonight the heavy guns take the stage, with Quasi, Fruit Bats and the Helio Sequence closing out the show in the evening. After the sun goes down, Dr. Oliver Fraser, a professor of astrophysics at the University of Washington, will give a free star talk in the field located by the main stage.

Those who crave even more music should head over to the campfire stage and check out Vikesh Kapoor and Noah Gundersen.

-Owen R. Smith, on Twitter @inanedetails

Comments | Topics: avians alight, jenn ghetto, king county


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►