Follow us:

Soundposts

A blog for Seattle music lovers of all stripes, from hip-hop and indie rock to jazz and world music.

July 28, 2013 at 11:08 PM

Capitol Hill Block Party 2013: Rock ‘n’ roll rules again, with a side of bounce rap

Flaming Lips singer Wayne Coyne, at Captiol Hill Block Party, 2013 (Lindsey Wasson/The Seattle Times)

Flaming Lips singer Wayne Coyne, at Capitol Hill Block Party, 2013 (Lindsey Wasson/The Seattle Times)

Flaming Lips frontman Wayne Coyne, amidst a blizzard of confetti and smoke effects Sunday night, declared the 16th annual Capitol Hill Block Party “a riot of love,” and the crowd indeed loved him in return. Beginning Friday afternoon and lasting through the weekend, the festival proved yet again to be one of Seattle’s loudest, most sunburned, most crazed parties. (For full photo coverage of the bands, check here. For documentation of Block Party style, check here.)

If you came for the scene, you were not alone: 130 security guards and 30,000 music fans crammed into two fenced-off city blocks, pulsing to more than 100 pop-music acts blaring on five stages. For music fans, think 22-year-olds screaming into phones trying to find their friends. Many appeared fully inebriated by 6 p.m.

If you came for the music, you could have witnessed an exciting group of young Pacific Northwest rock acts. Rock ’n’ roll hasn’t felt exciting here for a while (hip-hop had the juice, as they say), but it’s definitely on the upswing.

La Luz was tour-tight with its slowed-down surf rock on the main stage Saturday afternoon. (The band got in from Boise at 7 a.m.) The four-piece engaged the crowd in an exuberant “Soul Train”-style dance line down the center of Pike Street. Olympia’s Naomi Punk rocked hard and had the most original thinking of Saturday, according to audience member and former Seattle Times music critic Patrick MacDonald. Chastity Belt from Seattle moaned about emotions in a totally cathartic way, and White Lung from Vancouver ended every song with an exclamation point during their Friday set. It was all new and good.

The main stage area, near Broadway, was mainly for dancing. The big moment for that was when New Orleans rapper Big Freedia requested local ladies get on stage to bend over and shake it — the trademark movement for bounce rap. Among them was Rabia Qazi, singer for Rose Windows, who had performed shortly before.

“I’m from New Orleans and this is what we do, said Freedia, smiling in the early evening. “We always love to have a block party.”

Freedia’s up-tempo beats were warmly received. Hence, full participation on the call-and-response of: “I got that gin in my system/ somebody gonna be my victim!” If you can imagine it, the lyric felt full of love.

Early Sunday afternoon, Chastity Belt’s label mates (Help Yourself Records) Ubu Roi, from the U-District, played the most dude-ly punk rock imaginable, with songs about pizza and drinking and brotherly love.

Later, inside the 21-and-older Barboza, Tacoma rap trio ILLFIGHTYOU led a few hundred people through the stomping anthem “Threats,” and a new regional hit was born.

An in-your-face spirit drove the slightly less than family friendly alternative to Bumbershoot at Seattle Center. Block Party started out as an actual block party 16 years ago. Now it’s like Sasquatch! and Coachella: a slick, moneymaking festival. But it still has those morsels of do-it-yourself togetherness, and when you glimpse that, it’s the best party in town.

Andrew Matson: matsononmusic@gmail.com and @andrewmatson

Comments | More in Festivals, R & B/Hip-hop, Rock/Pop | Topics: Big Feedia, Capitol Hill Block Party, Chastity Belt

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►