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A blog for Seattle music lovers of all stripes, from hip-hop and indie rock to jazz and world music.

December 6, 2013 at 8:00 AM

Pop eccentrics The Dismemberment Plan at The Neptune | Concert preview

The Dismemberment Plan

The Dismemberment Plan in 2001. Photo by David Halloway.

Few late 1990s acts captured the feeling of a scene in flux as effectively as The Dismemberment Plan, a Washington, D.C. outfit that filtered underground-rock traditions — post-collegiate ennui, the do-it-yourself ethos — through music-conservatory chops, disco-funk sass and an unironic love of Top 40 radio.

The recently-reunited foursome plays Saturday at The Neptune Theatre in Seattle.

The D-Plan’s fanbase always reflected its varied sound. Indie arbiters Pitchfork awarded 1999’s “Emergency & I” a coveted 9.6 rating, calling it “groundbreaking,” and Pearl Jam even handpicked them to open their 2000 European tour.

In 2002, the band co-headlined a series of U.S. dates with Death Cab For Cutie, but just as those Northwest pop-rockers were rising, The D-Plan was peaking. They broke up the next year.

This past October, however, singer-guitarist Travis Morrison, guitarist Jason Caddell, bassist Eric Axelson and drummer Joe Easley staged a comeback with “Uncanney Valley,” their first album together since 2001’s “Change.”

Although reviews were mixed (see Soundposts’ here), The D-Plan’s jittery genre-blending tends to translate best in the live setting anyway.

See for yourself this weekend — and bring your dancing shoes.

The Dismemberment Plan, Telekinesis
9 p.m. Saturday at The Neptune Theatre, 1303 NE 45th St., Seattle; $25 (206-682-1414 or stgpresents.org)

0 Comments | More in Rock/Pop | Topics: indie-rock, The Neptune, Washington D.C.

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