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A blog for Seattle music lovers of all stripes, from hip-hop and indie rock to jazz and world music.

February 18, 2014 at 10:00 AM

Conscious punks Propagandhi to shred Seattle | Concert preview

Propagandhi

Propagandhi, from left: Chris Hannah, Dave Guillas, Todd Kowalski, Jord Samolesky. Photo by Mandy Malazdrewich.

Ever notice how many comedians come from Canada? Our northern neighbours have always been outspoken — not just in comedy, but punk rock as well.

Exhibit A: D.O.A. Part of the genre’s late-1970s first wave, the Vancouver trio spent three-plus decades writing the book on political sounds with a black-comedic streak.

Exhibit B: Propagandhi, which plays a sold-out all-ages show Wednesday at Neumos. Although the Winnipeg band’s name is a nostalgia trigger for anyone raised on ‘90s skate-punk, it was slightly out-of-step with that scene.

As their American counterparts Blink-182 and NOFX spouted off about girls, boredom and beer, vocalist-guitarist Chris Hannah and drummer Jord Samolesky made teaching moments — on topics including racism, sexism, homophobia and animal liberation — fast, fun and to-the-point.

Lots has happened since — in music, and the world — but Propagandhi has stood its ground.

The watershed, 9/11-era “Today’s Empires, Tomorrow’s Ashes” (listen) and 2005′s emotionally-charged “Potemkin City Limits” (listen) signaled a shift towards a more austere style, characterized by knottier song constructs and a bleaker lyrical outlook than before, reinforced by two new additions — bassist-vocalist Todd Kowalski and second guitarist David Guillas.

While the foursome’s sixth and most recent outing, 2012’s “Failed States” (listen), doesn’t deviate far from that formula, its power, purpose and wit — naturally — endures.

Propagandhi, The Flatliners, War On Women
7 p.m. Wednesday at Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., Seattle; sold out (206-709-9442 or neumos.com)

0 Comments | More in Rock/Pop | Topics: Canada, Neumos, punk

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