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April 7, 2014 at 8:51 AM

Cartoonist Ward Sutton revisits Nirvana

NirvanaWardSutton

Nirvana, as drawn by cartoonist, illustrator and rock-poster artist Ward Sutton.

Nirvana will be inducted into Cleveland’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on Thursday, April 10, in a ceremony in Brooklyn, N.Y.

In anticipation, The Seattle Times asked artist Ward Sutton to draw a tribute to the band. Sutton, a New York-based cartoonist, illustrator and rock-poster artist, lived in Seattle in the band’s heyday in the early 1990s, when the city was — as he remembers it — “a mecca for creative, open-minded twentysomethings.”

Kurt Cobain’s suicide in April 1994 put a punctuation mark on that era. Fifteen years later, in 1999, Sutton drew “An alternate history of Kurt Cobain” for the Village Voice, which imagined a world in which Nirvana’s frontman lived to wrestle with his artistry and face old age.

Today, Sutton prefers to think of Cobain as “focused on his music and being literally lifted by his fans.”

Thursday’s induction will be recorded for broadcast on HBO on May 31. Kurt Cobain biographer Charles R. Cross (“Heavier Than Heaven,” “Here We Are Now”) will report on the ceremony for The Seattle Times.

Additional coverage:

Columnist Nicole Brodeur looks at how Nirvana’s success changed Seattle — and how it didn’t

Contemporaries and music-industry types speak to Nirvana’s legacy

An invitation to share your Nirvana memories

A rewind of a chat with Kurt Cobain biographer Charles R. Cross

A review of Cross’ book “Here We Are Now”

Photo gallery: Looking at Cobain and Nirvana

Comments | More in General news, Rock/Pop | Topics: Nirvana, Nirvana cartoon, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

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