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A blog for Seattle music lovers of all stripes, from hip-hop and indie rock to jazz and world music.

August 21, 2014 at 5:50 PM

Dafnis Prieto to join world musicians in special quartet | Concert preview

(Courtesy of Maya Illusion)

Maya Illusion: Osam Ezzeldin, Ganesh Rajagopalan, Dafnis Prieto and Jayanthi Raman (Courtesy of the artists)

An unusual world-jazz collaboration featuring one of the most exciting drummers in jazz and an Indian master violinist is afoot Friday, Aug. 22, in Seattle, thanks to the Seattle chapter of the Association for India’s Development (AID).

The concert features the newly formed quartet Maya Illusion, which features Cuban drummer, composer and MacArthur “genius” fellow Dafnis Prieto, who has played with Roy Hargrove, Claudia Acuña and Chucho Valdés and performed last year at the Earshot Jazz Festival. Maya Illusion also showcases renowned Indian violinist Ganesh Rajagopalan, who recently has been serving as honorary artistic director of Rasika, an arts and cultural school in Hillsboro, Ore.

Rajagopalan works in the classical Carnatic style, but takes a keen interest in collaborating with jazz musicians and players from other cultures.

The other members of Maya Illusion are Egyptian-American keyboard player Osam Ezzeldin and the exquisite dancer/choreographer  Jayanthi Raman, who will be familiar to patrons of the Northwest Folklife Festival, where she has performed many times.

It’s hard to say just what the group will sound like, as there are as yet no recordings. But rhythmic excitement and complexity surely will come into play, perhaps in the spirit of the ecstatic momentum of John McLaughlin’s jazz-Indian fusions.

Proceeds from the concert go toward AID programs in India, which include a wide range of eco-friendly projects as well as education. According to its website, the organization was founded in 1991 and has 36 chapters in the U.S.

Maya Illusion

7:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 22 at Kane Hall, University of Washington; $20-50 (http://dhwani.aidseattle.org).

 

 

 

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