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Soundposts

A blog for Seattle music lovers of all stripes, from hip-hop and indie rock to jazz and world music.

September 17, 2014 at 9:00 AM

Your week in Seattle music: Heart, Blake Shelton and more

Also featuring a Jonas Brother trying to launch a solo career, a nostalgia-loving British psych-rock band and Spain’s most accomplished bagpipes player.

1 Heart

7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, at The Showbox, 1426 First Ave., Seattle; $75 (206-628-3151 or www.showboxpresents.com).

This is a rare club show from Heart, Seattle’s most-recent Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame inductees, and its ticket price that matches Showbox 75th anniversary it’s helping commemorate. Still, for diehards, this show’s a chance to see Northwest rock legends in a room a fraction the size of the ones they usually play.

2 LP

8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, at Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., Seattle; $13 (206-709-9442 or www.neumos.com). With Odessa

Though she plays ukulele and is a proficient whistler, Laura Pergolizzi could hardly be described as cutesy or twee. That’s largely due to her powerful voice, the unquestioned centerpiece of each song she writes. It’s an instrument that lends some Mumford and Sons–style bombast to her folk-pop tunes.

3 Blake Shelton

5:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 19, at Tacoma Dome, 2727 E. D St., Tacoma; $26.75–$51.75 (253-272-3663 or www.tacomadome.org).

Shelton is one of country’s biggest stars, and it’s not hard to see why. His most popular songs are comfy midtempo ballads that deal in familiar tropes of Southern life, and it’s a formula that’s resulted in 11 No. 1 country singles. The exception is “Boys ’Round Here,” a half-rapped number whose video is nonetheless a game of count-the-stereotypes.

4 The Hood Internet

8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 19, at Nectar Lounge, 412 N. 36th St., Seattle; $10–$15 (206-632-2020 or www.nectarlounge.com). With Pressha, DJ Swervewon, The Turntable Einstein

Chicago production duo The Hood Internet got its start in the mid-2000s, making mashups of rap and indie rock (e.g., Phoenix v. R. Kelly or, more representative, Juvenile vs. Passion Pit). It’s not a sound that’s aged well, but the group has since moved onto writing hip-hop–leaning original tracks, which comprised the bulk of 2012 debut album “FEAT.”

(Ebru Yildiz)

(Ebru Yildiz)

5 Carlos Nuñez

6:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 20, at Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., Seattle; $10–$30(206-652-4255 or www.townhallseattle.org).

Here’s something a little different: Town Hall Seattle brings in Spanish musician Carlos Nuñez—described as “Galacia’s greatest traditional piper”—who performs the Celtic music that flourished in medieval Spain. Nuñez plays the gaita, a variety of bagpipes.

6

Temples

8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 20, at The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., Seattle; $20 (206-784-4849 or www.stgpresents.org). With Wampire

British quartet Temples quite transparently draws nearly every aspect of its sound and aesthetic from ’60s psychedelic rock, earning high praise from the ever backward-looking British music press and classic rock icons like Johnny Marr. Nevertheless, it’s well-produced and cannily composed, and other recent bands with this sound have done just fine for themselves.

7 Jeff the Brotherhood

8 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 21, at Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., Seattle; $13.50–$15 (206-324-8005 or www.chopsuey.com). With Music Band, Snuff Redux

Hailing from Nashville’s fertile punk scene, guitar-and-drums duo Jeff the Brotherhood hasn’t released new music in two years (an EP of classic-rock covers is coming this fall), but recordings aren’t its specialty, anyway. Like many bands of its ilk, its stripped-down blues rock works best live.

8 Nick Jonas

7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 22, at The Showbox, 1426 First Ave., Seattle; $29.50–$32 (206-628-3151 or www.showboxpresents.com).

It seems like ages ago, but the Jonas Brothers were tween pop’s biggest name in a pre-Bieber world sometime around 2008, when this song I have no recollection of was apparently a top-five hit. The band broke up last year amid internal strife, and now youngest brother Nick is launching the “serious singer-songwriter” phase of his career.

9 Bob Mould Band

8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 23, at The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., Seattle; $23.50–$25 (206-784-4849 or www.stgpresents.org). With Cymbals Eat Guitars

Mould is touring behind “Beauty & Ruin,” an introspective record that finds the 53-year-old musician reflecting on his career, which has seen him front influential indie-rock bands like Husker Du and Sugar. He’s joined on this tour by bassist Jason Narducy and drummer Jon Wurster (Superchunk, The Mountain Goats).

10 Prefuse 73

9 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 24, at Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., Seattle; $15 (206-709-9442 or www.neumos.com). With Ana Sia, WD40

With multiple releases on esteemed electronic label Warp Records, Guillermo Scott Herren makes music as Prefuse 73 that sits at the crossroads of instrumental hip-hop and out-there ambiance. He headlines this show on the opening night of Decibel Festival.

(The Windish Agency)

(The Windish Agency)

Comments | More in List | Topics: Blake Shelton, Bob Mould, Carlos Nunez

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