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Soundposts

A blog for Seattle music lovers of all stripes, from hip-hop and indie rock to jazz and world music.

November 5, 2014 at 9:00 AM

Your week in Seattle music: Tony Bennett, Tegan and Sara and more

Also featuring a classically inclined electronic musician, a proudly Southern rapper and a remix savant.

1 Tony Bennett

7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 6, at The Paramount, 911 Pine St., Seattle; $50–$150 (360-467-5520 or www.stgpresents.org).

 

When Tony Bennett topped the Billboard charts last month with “Cheek to Cheek,” a duet standards album with Lady Gaga, he broke his own record for the oldest person to have a No. 1 album in the United States. The 88-year-old is still a dynamic and gracious performer.

2 Hiss Golden Messenger

8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 6, at Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., Seattle; $12 (206-709-9951 or www.thebarboza.com). With Phil Cook

As Hiss Golden Messenger, the North Carolina duo of M.C. Taylor and Scott Hirsch make folk music that’s raw and quite pretty. Taylor, the group’s singer, has a craggy, unorthodox voice that bears a bit of resemblance to that of another modern folk artist.

3 Nils Frahm

8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 6, at The Showbox, 1426 First Ave., Seattle; $26.50–$34 (206-628-3151 or www.showboxpresents.com). With Dawn of Midi

 

 

For many electronic acts, there’s a great difference between a meticulously produced track and its live performance. Not so for post-classical pianist and producer Frahm, whose most-recent album “Spaces” is, a collection of live recordings. During his live show, he creates towering landscapes of keys and ambiance without the aid of a computer.

4 RAC

8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 7, and Saturday, Nov. 8, at The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., Seattle; $21.50 (206-441-7416 or www.thecrocodile.com). With The Knocks, Speak

Originally an acronym of “Remix Artist Collective,” RAC is now the work of just one man, André Allen Anjos. The producer  has a talent for making just about anything (though mostly catchy radio rock like Phoenix, Bastille and Imagine Dragons) sound like midtempo electro-pop. Anjos also producers original songs, most recently this year’s two-part “Strangers” release.

5 Relient K

7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 7 at The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., Seattle; $18–$20 (206-784-4849 OR www.stgpresents.org). With Blondfire, Indian Lakes

With last year’s “Collapsible Lung,” Ohio band Relient K made a conscious move away from its signature sound—hooky pop-punk with a not-quite-overt Christian message that found its lyrics etched in many a middle schooler’s trapper keeper. Its latest is a full-on pop album featuring outside songwriters who’ve worked with Bruno Mars and Lady Gaga, but this tour commemorates the anniversary of 2004 album “Mmhmm.”

6 Frankie Rose

7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 8, at Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., Seattle; $12 (206-709-9951 or www.thebarboza.com). With Cold Beat, Ephrata

Singer/songwriter/guitarist Frankie Rose is a veteran of several retro-leaning New York garage-rock bands like Crystal Stilts, Dum Dum Girls and Vivian Girls. Her washed-out dream pop sounds similarly infatuated with the past (many songs wouldn’t sound out of place in an ’80s teen movie), her voice adrift in a haze of synth and reverb.

7 Blonde Redhead

8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 8, at Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., Seattle; $20 (206-709-9442 or www.neumos.com). With Hungry Ghost

New York trio Blonde Redhead are a tough group to pin down, having dabbled in many strains of alternative rock over its 20-plus-year career. A constant, though, is the group’s textured, inventive guitar sounds, a product of having two guitarists and no bassist. The band is touring behind “Barragán,” its first album in four years.

8 Greensky Bluegrass

7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 9, at The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., Seattle; $20–$25 (206-784-4849 or www.stgpresents.org). With Dead Winter Carpenters

 It’s the rare bluegrass act that can play a theater-sized venue in 2014, and Greensky Bluegrass is one of the few that can. Akin to other popular bluegrass-influenced bands like Nickel Creek or Trampled by Turtles, the Kalamazoo, Mich. fivesome combines technical acuity with enough pop accessibility to interest fans who couldn’t tell a dobro from a dodo.

9 Tegan and Sara

6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 11, at The Paramount, 911 Pine St., Seattle; $31.25–$41.25 (360-467-5520 or www.stgpresents.org). With Waters, The Courtneys

Twin sister indie act Tegan and Sara’s profile has grown greatly in recent years, owing largely to the success of 2012’s “Heartthrob,” an album that emphasized big hooks over guitar-led songwriting. Case in point: the last time the duo was in Seattle, it was opening for Katy Perry.

10 Yelawolf

8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 12, at The Showbox, 1426 First Ave., Seattle; $20–$25 (206-628-3151 or www.showboxpresents.com). With Rittz, Big Henry, DJ Klever

It’s not exactly novel for rappers to talk about where they’re from, but Yelawolf makes his background clearer than most. Proudly Southern, the Alabama rapper’s music sits at the intersection of hip-hop and country culture. Single “Till It’s Gone” (swear words in link) could practically get airplay on country radio.

Comments | More in List | Topics: Blonde Redhead, Frankie Rose, Greensky Bluegrass

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