403 Forbidden


nginx
403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx
Follow us:
403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx

Soundposts

A blog for Seattle music lovers of all stripes, from hip-hop and indie rock to jazz and world music.

February 18, 2015 at 9:00 AM

Your week in Seattle music: Brandi Carlile, Cold War Kids and more

Also featuring smooth disco from Australia, beat experimentations from Los Angeles and two very different takes on experimental noise rock.

1 Midday Veil

8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 18, at Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., Seattle; $10 (206-709-9442 or www.neumos.com). With Hibou, NAVVI, Sister Girlfriend

This is a diverse bill of local acts, ranging from psychedelia to surf to electro-pop. Headliners Midday Veil are one of the more interesting rock bands to emerge from Seattle in the past few years; it’s progressive rock that’s more interested in experimentation than pretension.

(Frank Correa)

(Frank Correa)

2 Salva

9 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 18, at Q Nightclub, 1426 Broadway, Seattle; $12 (206-432-9306 or www.qnightclub.com). With Girl Unit, Ca$h Bandicoot, Tony Snark

Salva’s chosen lane is subwoofer-rattling, hip-hop-influenced trap music that draws from the G-funk West Coast rap heritage of Los Angeles. In October, he released “Peacemaker,” a full-length album/mixtape that features a whole bunch of A-list rappers: Young Thug, Schoolboy Q and A$AP Ferg, among others.

3 Giraffage

8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 19, at Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., Seattle; $15 (206-709-9442 or www.neumos.com). With Spazzkid, DJ Hojo

As Giraffage, Charlie Yin accomplishes the impressive feat of producing tracks subtle enough for headphone listening but lively enough for clubs. One need only spent a few minutes on SoundCloud (and, with its new financing model, hear about five ads) to see that his buoyant, hyper-modern take on R&B is a zeitgeist-y sound right now.

4 Brandi Carlile

7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 20, at The Moore, 1931 Second Ave., Seattle; $32.50–$72.50 (206-467-5510 or www.stgpresents.org).

Billed as “a show so intimate you can hear a pin drop” (which, at the 1,400-seat Moore, is probably hyperbolic), this all-acoustic performance from Washington native Brandi Carlile benefits KEXP’s $15 million rebuilding project. Carlile’s bucolic music is well-suited for this sort of environment.

5 Cold War Kids

8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 20, at The Showbox, 1426 First Ave., Seattle; $22–$25 (206-628-3151 or www.showboxpresents.com). With Elliot Moss

There was a lot that stood out about Cold War Kids at the time of its 2006 debut: Nathan Willett’s ragged vocals, pounding piano chords and an bluesy rock sound that deviated from the White Stripes guitar ’n’ drums paradigm. Though CWK is apparently a killer live act, none of the band’s records since then have the same immediacy.

6 Pharmakon

9 p.m. Friday, Feb. 20, at Kremwerk, 1809 Minor Ave. S., Seattle; $12–$16 (206-682-2935 or www.kremwerk.com). With Garek Jon Druss, Pink Void, Knifecream, DJ Sharlese

In 2013, Margaret Chardiet was hospitalized for weeks after doctors discovered a cyst that nearly killed her. The ordeal spurred Chardiet—who, as Pharmakon, is a veteran of the New York noise scene—to write “Bestial Burden,” an album about the corporeal and grotesque. Expect a punishing, visceral performance.

7 Flight Facilities

8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 21, at The Showbox, 1426 First Ave., Seattle; $20–$25 (206-628-3151 or www.showboxpresents.com). With Beat Connection

Like a lot of Australian electronic music, Flight Facilities’ output is immaculately produced, highly stylized and easily danced to. The production duo works with a melodic strain of house and balearic disco, making for sunny, pop-forward tunes.

 

8 Six Organs of Admittance

9 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 21, at Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., Seattle; $12 (206-784-4880 or www.sunsettavern.com). With Elisa Ambrogio

On new album “Hexadic,” guitarist Ben Chasny has lofty goals. The Six Organs of Admittance mastermind wrote its nine tracks according to a compositional system of his own invention designed to “extinguish patterns and generate new means of chord progressions and choices.” It’s heady stuff, and a lot of it sounds like a long, noisy guitar solo.

(Billions)

(Billions)

9 MNDSGN

8 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 22, at Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., Seattle; $8 (206-709-9951 or www.thebarboza.com). With IG88, Eddie Bermuda

 One doesn’t need to spend much time browsing his extensive Bandcamp discography to get a feel for L.A. artist MNDSGN’s (pronounced “mind design”) production style. Signed to alternative hip-hop label Stone’s Throw, he aims to create his mellow beat explorations “in a state of bliss.”

10 The Church

6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 23, and Tuesday, Feb. 24, at The Triple Door, 216 Union St., Seattle; $32–$37 (206-838-4333 OR www.thetripledoor.com).

Australian new wave band The Church made its biggest impression on American with 1988 single “Under the Milky Way,” which peaked at No. 24 on the pop charts and was later used to great effect in cult classic film “Donnie Darko.” Last October’s “Further/Deeper” is the group’s 21st album and first without founding guitarist Marty Willson-Piper.

Comments | More in List | Topics: Brandi Carlile, Cold War Kids, Flight Facilities

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx
403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx