Follow us:

Soundposts

A blog for Seattle music lovers of all stripes, from hip-hop and indie rock to jazz and world music.

Author archives

You are currently viewing all posts written by Gillian G. Gaar.

September 2, 2014 at 4:01 PM

Sleater-Kinney returns with new box set

Something to celebrate: a new box set from Sleater-Kinney (Sub Pop Records)

Something to celebrate: a new box set from Sleater-Kinney (Sub Pop Records)

Sleater-Kinney, the acclaimed Pacific Northwest indie trio hailed as the “Best Band in America” by “Time” magazine in 2001, left many fans disappointed when they went on what was called “indefinite hiatus” in 2006. There’s been no word of any reunion as yet. But today it was announced that a box set of the group’s recordings, “Start Together” is on its way.

All seven of Sleater-Kinney’s albums — “Sleater-Kinney,” “Call the Doctor,” “Dig Me Out,” “The Hot Rock,” “All Hands On the Bad One,” “One Beat,” and “The Woods — have been remastered for the set, which will be released on October 21 by Sub Pop. Along with standard vinyl and CD versions, there’s also a nifty limited edition box (in a run of only 3000) featuring the albums on colored vinyl, an accompanying book with previously unreleased photos, and a limited edition print. Digital editions of the albums went on sale today, September 2, at iTunes, Amazon, and Sub Pop’s Mega Mart.

Fans will be disappointed that the set contains no bonus material. But the remastering does provide a new listening experience. “For such ferocious music, it was actually a very delicate process,” Greg Calbi, who remastered the albums at Sterling Sound in New York City, said in a press release. “I found, in dealing with one of the earlier albums, that my signal path and compression, including my Burl B2 convertor, gave me a more resonant, deeper sound on the guitars than the originals. Because the band rarely, if ever, used bass, I felt that this added to the aggressiveness and power of the band overall. I believe this treatment added a subtle, yet important, dimension to the band, and I explored each of the other albums with the same intention.”

More

Comments | More in Rock/Pop | Topics: Carrie Brownstein, Corin Tucker, Janet Weiss

September 2, 2014 at 5:00 AM

‘No Seattle’ highlights lesser known NW rock acts | Record preview

"No Seattle" documents the great variety of the NW's indie music scene (photo: Soul Jazz Records)

“No Seattle” documents the great variety of the NW’s indie music scene (photo: Soul Jazz Records)

The grunge boom of the ’90s didn’t happen in a vacuum. Before the world had heard of Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, and Alice in Chains, Northwest clubs were ringing to the sounds of acts like Hitting Birth, Vampire Lezbos, Chemistry Set, and Thrillerhammer.

Clark Humphrey’s “Loser: The Real Seattle Music Story” and Mark Yarm’s oral history “Everybody Loves Our Town” were among the few books that put the grunge scene in this wider context. Now comes the audio equivalent, “No Seattle: Forgotten Sounds of the North-West Grunge Era 1986-97,” set for release September 9, in CD, vinyl, and digital formats.

The compilation features 23 different bands, largely unknown today but featuring a fair number of familiar names in the lineups. The Ones featured Jack Endino on bass, before Endino became Sub Pop’s go-to producer for the burgeoning Seattle music scene. When Bundle of Hiss went their separate ways, drummer Dan Peters joined (and still plays with) Mudhoney, while bassist Kurt Danielson took up with the heavyweight TAD. And after her tenure in Kill Sybil, drummer Patty Schemel became the drummer for Hole.

More

Comments | More in Rock/Pop | Topics: Nick Soulsby, Nirvana, Northwest rock

July 13, 2014 at 12:26 PM

Light in the Attic provides cool sounds on a hot day

For those seeking a little outdoor fun, while staying out of the sun, Light in the Attic’s First Annual Summer Spectacular offered a great way to find some relief from the record-breaking heat.

Barry Overton's set gave LITA's event a jazzy touch . (photo: Gillian G. Gaar)

Overton Berry’s set gave LITA’s event a jazzy touch . (photo: Gillian G. Gaar)

The Seattle-based record label, known for its reissue projects like the “Wheedle’s Groove” CD and film covering Seattle’s ’70s-era funk scene, and a lavish box set by iconoclastic singer-songwriter Lee Hazlewood, hosted a laid-back afternoon of live entertainment yesterday at their warehouse/record store on a quiet street in Ballard.

More

Comments | More in Festivals, Jazz, Rock/Pop | Topics: Alex Maas, Black Angles, Light in the Attic

June 30, 2014 at 10:59 AM

‘A Hard Day’s Night’ still fresh after 50 years |Movie preview

When United Artists arranged to produce the Beatles’ first feature film, “A Hard Day’s Night,” in 1964, the company’s sole intention was to cash in on a craze before it fizzled out — which, considering the fickle tastes of teenagers, they expected would happen in about six months. Instead, “A Hard Day’s Night” became a classic,…

More

Comments | More in General news, Rock/Pop | Topics: A Hard Day's Night, Movie Preview, The Beatles

June 29, 2014 at 10:18 AM

Cher still a powerhouse at KeyArena D2K show | Concert review

Cher was dressed to thrill for her lavish “Dressed to Kill” show at KeyArena Saturday night. There was Warrior Queen Cher, who emerged from a Trojan Horse in a golden gladiator outfit and blonde wig. There was Vampire Cher, with an elaborate, bat-shaped headdress and a set of fangs she sank into her not unwilling male…

More

Comments | More in Rock/Pop | Topics: Cher, Concert Review, Cyndi Lauper

June 16, 2014 at 2:21 PM

Funhouse legacy celebrated at Columbia City Theater | Concert review

Scrappy Seattle punk club the Funhouse may be gone. But its spirit lives on, as evidenced by last night’s screening of “Razing the Bar,” a documentary about the rise and fall of the club, at the Columbia City Theater, followed by a live show featuring bands that used to play the much-missed venue.

The wacky Fabulous Downey Brothers (photo: Gillian G. Gaar)

The wacky Fabulous Downey Brothers (photo: Gillian G. Gaar)

“Razing the Bar” had its world premiere last month at the Seattle International Film Festival (with two sold-out screenings), and is scheduled for a one-week run at the Grand Illusion theater in the University District in July. But last night’s screening was about having a party. First-time director Ryan Worsley hugged supporters and well-wishers who packed the sold-out house, the celebratory mood enhanced by the bar conveniently located inside the theater (Rainier proving to be the tipple of choice, judging by the empty cans littering the floor). As the film played, cheers of recognition broke out whenever a familiar face was seen on the screen, followed by boos and hisses at the sight of encroaching urban development (the Funhouse, located by the Seattle Center, was demolished in 2012 to make way for a seven-story apartment building).

More

Comments | More in Rock/Pop | Topics: Concert Review, the Funhouse

May 1, 2014 at 12:58 PM

Unlike their music, Righteous Brothers book is bland

The Righteous Brothers, first promo photo (Moonglow Records)

The Righteous Brothers, first promo photo (Moonglow Records)

“The Time of My Life:  A Righteous Brothers’ Memoir”
Bill Medley with Mike Marino
Da Capo Press, $26.99

“You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’.” “Unchained Melody.” “(You’re My) Soul and Inspiration.” These classic tracks by the Righteous Brothers burst with the kind of passion that’s made them romantic standards since their release close to half a century ago.

More

Comments | More in Rock/Pop | Topics: Bill Medley, Book review, The Righteous Brothers

Next Page »