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Take 2

A different spin on sports by The Seattle Times staff and readers.

November 30, 2013 at 10:20 AM

Seattle Times sports readers sound off

polliard cartoonHuskies

Give Sankey ball, new first name

It’s time for the Dawgs to promote Bishop Sankey to Archbishop. And if he sticks around for his senior season, Cardinal Sankey is within reach.

– Dennis Brooke, Auburn

Don’t forget about offensive line

It was a great Huskies win against the Beavers. Loved it. But after reading The Seattle Times coverage, I came away wondering if anyone on the staff understands the game of football. The Huskies just completed the second-greatest output for the run game in the history of the program with three backs (including two that almost never play) way over 100 yards, and there is not one mention in all of The Times’ coverage of the incredible play of the Huskies’ offensive line?

Come on. Do you guys know where football games are won and lost? The Huskies have great backs, particularly Bishop Sankey, and it is great to watch what they do when they get into the open field, but they would be the first to tell you that they would have achieved nothing on this or any other day without the awesome performance of the athletes on the O-line. Go back and watch these guys sustain their blocks, pulling guards kicking out defensive ends, sealing the edge, opening up gaping holes or making critical downfield blocks to break long runs.

Husky fans know the huge importance of the offensive (and defensive) lines. I hope The Times catches up soon.

– David B. Richardson, Bellevue

Who needs bad headlines?

What a ridiculous and insulting headline on the front page of the Sports section last Sunday morning: “So who needs a QB.”

I’m glad I wasn’t Cyler Miles waking up to read that one. We had a QB and a damn good one last night — a freshman taking over in a game that your brilliant staff told us all week was the “defining, make or break game” of the season and possibly of coach Steve Sarkisian’s job.

We not only did we have one QB we had three — injured Keith Price working the sidelines, Miles playing almost error-free football and Jeff Lindquist coming in at the end of the game. Your headline minimizes and insults their talents and efforts.

– Mike Jones, Seattle

Seahawks

Perplexed about lack of judgment

Rather than be frustrated or angry at the conduct of two Seahawk cornerbacks, Brandon Browner and Walter Thurmond, like some others in 12th Man land, this fan is mainly perplexed. Perplexed as to how two accomplished professional athletes on the verge of financially capitalizing on their on-field performance, through pending free agency, could be so foolish as to jeopardize themselves, their families and possibly their team, by trying to beat what appears to be a very thorough and stringent drug-testing program administered by the NFL.

It’s kind of Exhibit A for all those who say marijuana impairs judgment, isn’t it?

– Jon Engman, Newcastle

How can Browner be so stupid?

I just read about the likely suspension of Seahawks cornerback Brandon Browner. How can one be so stupid? I guess they do not get hired for their intellect and modesty.

– Daniel Dofelmier, Mill Creek

Mariners

Armstrong didn’t win Nobel either

Retiring Mariners president Chuck Armstrong says his “only regret is not winning the World Series.” I thought that to legitimately regret an unattained goal, one has to have been in the neighborhood of being able to sniff it.
It’s kind of like Bill Nye saying his only regret is not winning the Nobel Prize for Science.

– Lew Witham, Seattle

NFL

Nothing wrong with old-fashioned tie

I just finished watching Green Bay tie Minnesota, and I thought, “wonderful — a tie!” Why is it that we no longer have ties? Is it because we are obsessed with winning and losing?

A tie used to mean that one team wasn’t better than another that day. They could settle it next year, on the field. Also, a tie meant you did not lose!

There is nothing wrong with ties in sport. Maybe they need to make a comeback!

– Phil Payne, Everett

Send us your backtalk: Letters bearing real names, addresses and telephone numbers for verification are considered for publication. Please limit letters to 125 words or less. They are subject to editing and become the property of The Times. Fax them to 206-493-0934, or mail to: Backtalk, Seattle Times Sports, P.O. Box 70, Seattle, WA 98111. Or email to: sports@seattletimes.com

Want to be a reader contributor to The Seattle Times’ Take 2 blog? Email your original, previously unpublished work or proposal to Sports Editor Don Shelton at dshelton@seattletimes.com or sports@seattletimes.com. Not all submissions can be published. The Times reserves the right to edit and publish any submissions online and/or in print.

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The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


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