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Take 2

A different spin on sports by The Seattle Times staff and readers.

February 21, 2014 at 6:58 AM

Seahawks repeat? Finding parallels between Seattle, 1970s Dolphins dynasty

Former Miami Dolphins coach Don Shula, center, poses with quarterbacks from his 1972 Dolphins team, Earl Morrell, left, and Bob Griese.  Associated Press file, 1972

Former Miami Dolphins coach Don Shula, center, poses with quarterbacks from his 1972 Dolphins team, Earl Morrell, left, and Bob Griese.
Associated Press file, 1972

By Cathy Edelman

This year’s World Champion Seahawks are not your father’s team. They are actually my father’s team.

My father has long passed away, but not his love for the Miami Dolphins of the early 1970s, which he passed on to me. You see, my father was a loyal season-ticket holder and saw a Miami team rise from obscurity to three straight Super Bowl appearances. There would have been more had three star players  from that offense – Larry Csonka, Paul Warfield and Jim Kiick – not bolted for more money (take note, Paul Allen) to a short-lived rival football league.

When I watched and cheered for the Seahawks as they rolled to victory in Super Bowl XLVII Feb. 2, I could not help but notice that lucky Seattle fans are witnessing a dynasty in the making.  This Seahawks team is a mirror image of the early 1970s Dolphins, which won back-to-back Super Bowls in 1972 and ’73, including an unbeaten season in ’72. If any team is capable of pulling off a similar dynastic feat or going undefeated, it will be the Seahawks.

What are the parallels between these two teams?

First, charismatic, highly successful coaches who can both motivate and lead their teams. Don Shula and Pete Carroll are cut from the same coaching cloth.

Franchise quarterbacks who are not flashy, but cerebral and good at eluding pressure while looking to throw the ball downfield. Bob Griese and Russell Wilson are quite similar and proved they are not just “game managers”.

Punishing power running backs?  Larry Csonka and Marshawn Lynch both fit that bill.

How about a game changing receiver? Check. Paul Warfield and Percy Harvin are those guys.

How about solid, dependable, no-name receivers? Both teams have plenty of pass-catchers who get open and move the chains on third down. Just mundane, boring stuff that wins games.

Both defenses were underrated and neither received much recognition. Didn’t, that is, until each proved itself on the biggest of stages – the Super Bowl.

The No Name Defense of the Dolphins and the faceless front four of the Seahawks epitomize a relentless, gritty, hold-your-ground mentality on which championships are built.

In comparing the back ends of both defenses, both mirror one another perfectly. Each team boasts tremendous safeties who make plays all over the field. Dick Anderson and Jake Scott epitomized those traits, as do Earl Thomas and Kam Chancellor.  True, there was no one quite like Richard Sherman as a bona-fide shut down cornerback on the Dolphins roster.

Oh, and both teams had poised, highly effective field-goal kickers who never seemed to miss. Perhaps it is their Eastern European lineage, tracing their roots to countries where babies come out of the womb kicking and soccer is king. All I know is that when either Garo Ypremian or Steven Hauschka attempted a field goal, the results were very good.

Enjoy and cherish your Seahawks, Seattle. Your Russell Wilson has conquered the football world at the tender age of 25. Can he, and the Seahawks, do it again?

I believe they can. Just like my father’s Dolphins.

Cathy Edelman lives in Aventura, Fla.

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