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October 27, 2011 at 10:27 AM

Student describes how he intervened in Snohomish High knife attack

By John Hopperstad
KCPQ

As a linebacker on the Snohomish High School football team, Travis Pickett has developed his skills for making split-second decisions.

On Monday, he proved that his abilities extend beyond the football field when he saw that one of his classmates had been stabbed multiple times.

Pickett saw a fellow student holding a knife over a pair of freshmen girls. There was blood on the floor. One of the victims had been stabbed approximately 20 times. Pickett didn’t run. He confronted the girl holding the knife.

“I just stood there and said, ‘Did you do this?’ ” Pickett said to the girl. “She shook her head yes, and at that point I looked down and there was a knife on the ground at her feet and I thought I saw her look down and my thought process was she’s going after the knife again, so I picked the knife up and threw it in the hall.”

Pickett got a teacher to help, and then called 911.

Pickett doesn’t consider himself a hero. In fact, he is quite humble about his reactions.

“I wouldn’t call it being heroic at all. I call it being responsible. I mean, I saw a situation, and I handled it like I think anyone should have.”

The seriousness of Monday’s incident hit him hard when he called his mother. “I turned into a baby right there,” he said, “I cried a lot.”

“Then later that night, we heard that her (the most injured victim’s) heart stopped, and at that point, we never heard that they got it going again. I thought she was gone.”

Since Monday, Pickett has learned that the victims are getting better.

“Now that I know they’re both OK, I can breathe easier. I come out to school, put a little smile on with my friends.”

— Information from McClatchy-Tribune Information Services

Comments | More in The Blotter | Topics: accident, Snohomish, stabbing

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