Follow us:

The Today File

Your guide to the latest news from around the Northwest

November 15, 2011 at 11:25 AM

Everett man to be extradited in war crimes case

An Everett man accused of participating in the massacre of Croatian civilians while a member of a Bosnian Army unit during the Balkan War in 1993 agreed this morning to be extradited to Bosnia-Herzegovina for trial.

Edin Dzeko appeared briefly today before U.S. Magistrate Judge James P. Donohue in U.S. District Court, where he acknowledged his identity and agreed to the extradition.

His attorney, David Gehrke, said after the hearing that Dzeko was “looking forward to returning to Bosnia-Herzegovina to face his accusers and confront the evidence against him.”

Dzeko, 39, a naturalized U.S. citizen, is accused in extradition documents of being a senior member of a unit that attacked the village of Trusina in April 1993, killing 16 civilians and at least four soldiers who had been disarmed, according to news reports at the time and a release from the U.S. Department of Justice.

The extradition request — which totals 400 pages — says that Dzeko and the members of his unit targeted Croatian civilians and soldiers of the Croatian Defense Council. During the attack on Trusina, according to the documents, Dzeko forced an injured man out of a house at gunpoint, where the man was shot and killed by another member of his unit.

The request contains dozens of official Bosnian military and prosecution documents, including numerous statements from witnesses, survivors and other soldiers in the unit.

Since Dzeko’s arrest in April, Gehrke said additional evidence that “could provide an alibi to the shootings of some of the soldiers” has been uncovered. In addition, new details disputing some of the government’s contentions have come up in trials of some of the commanders of Dzeko’s unit, he said.

To read Dzeko’s waiver of extradition, click here.

Comments | More in The Blotter | Topics: Everett, U.S. District Court

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►