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December 5, 2011 at 9:19 PM

Photo: Plastic Bag Monsters push for ban

(Jim Bates / The Seattle Times)

Jake Harris, also known as the Seattle Plastic Bag Monster, right, and Emma Klein, also known as Mrs. Seattle Plastic Bag Monster, testify in a street-theater-type performance mocking the plastic-bag industry at a public hearing on the proposed plastic-bag ban at City Hall in Seattle on Monday. They say it takes 500 bags to make each of their outfits, and the number of bags wasted each year in Seattle would fill all CenturyLink Field seats with a Plastic Bag Monster.

The Seattle City Council held the hearing to discuss the proposal to ban plastic carryout bags from grocery and retail stores. The bill also would impose a nickel fee on paper bags to offset the higher cost of paper to stores and to remind shoppers to bring in reusable bags.

The bill, modeled on one adopted earlier this year in Bellingham, still allows plastic bags for produce, bulk foods and meat. It also allows them for takeout food from restaurants and for the patrons of food banks and farmers markets. Low-income people using their state Basic Food cards would be exempt from the 5-cent fee.

Corrected version: Information in a photo caption on this item, originally published at 9:19 p.m. on Dec. 5, 2011, was corrected at 2:26 p.m. on Dec. 6, 2011. A previous version of the caption incorrectly identified the subjects in the photo as Jack Harris and Emma Kelin. The correct names are Jake Harris and Emma Klein. The post also stated that the number of bags wasted each year in Seattle would fill all Safeco Field seats. It should have said CenturyLink Field.

Comments | More in General news, Government, Photos | Topics: photos, plastic bags, plastic-bag ban

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