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March 7, 2012 at 8:59 AM

Teen convicted in Tuba Man killing is in jail on gun charge

Kenneth Daijon Kelly, 18, was charged late last month with unlawful possession of a firearm after Seattle police gang officers found a gun within his reach inside a car.

Kelly was arrested on Feb. 26, near Boeing Access Road and Martin Luther King Jr. Way South, while riding in a black 1993 Mercedes sedan. Police said in arresting paperwork that “Kelly is a self-admitted Valley Hood Priu street gang member from the Central District of Seattle.”

Gang officers said they noticed the car after the driver made a U-turn in the middle of a street. A license-plate records check found some discrepancies in the vehicle’s sales history, according to charging paperwork.

When the Mercedes stopped, police found four people inside. Kelly, who was in the back seat, declined to speak with officers about the gun, according to court documents.

Kelly spent time in juvenile detention in the beating death of Ed McMichael, 53, a quirky character known for playing everything from Black Sabbath to Bread on his tuba while outside Seattle sporting events. McMichael was pummeled by a group of teens after midnight on Oct. 25, 2008. Kelly and the other two teens charged in the slaying all pleaded guilty to first-degree manslaughter.

Because the three were juveniles when McMichael was slain, they faced between 36 and 72 weeks in jail — a sentence that displeased King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg.

“The truth is, our choice was to accept a juvenile sentence or allow the case to remain unsolved,” Satterberg said when the three pleaded guilty in 2009.

Kelly also has a prior conviction for second-degree robbery, according to prosecutors. He is being held at the King County Jail in lieu of $100,000 bail.

Comments | More in Sports, The Blotter | Topics: Boeing Access Road, Daijon Kelly, firearm

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