Follow us:

The Today File

Your guide to the latest news from around the Northwest

June 18, 2012 at 9:50 PM

State AmeriCorps director will be program’s national director

The 18-year executive director of Washington’s AmeriCorps programs, Bill Basl, will be AmeriCorps’ next national director, it was announced on Monday.

Basl founded the nation’s first veterans’ corps and is known for creating a collaborative regional network to provide AmeriCorps training across the Pacific Northwest. While executive director of the Washington Commission for National and Community Service, which operates AmeriCorps programs for the state, the White House named Basl a Champion of Change Service Innovator.

Gov. Chris Gregoire gave him a bittersweet congratulations after hearing about the appointment.

“While I’m sorry to see Bill leave us for the other Washington, I am thrilled for him and even more thrilled for the 80,000 AmeriCorps members he will help lead,” Gregoire said in a statement. “For the past 18 years Bill has served our state well and has made volunteerism and community service a way of life for thousands of Washingtonians.”

Basl began his career as an AmeriCorps VISTA member serving migrant farm workers in Eastern Washington, according to a release from the Corporation for National and Community Service. From there, he moved on to a career in state government where he founded the Washington Service Corps in 1983.

More than 80,000 Americans serve in AmeriCorps, a network of local, state, and national service programs. Through more than 3,000 nonprofits, public agencies, faith-based programs and other community organizations, members tutor and mentor youth, build affordable housing, teach computer skills, clean parks and streams, run after-school programs, or help communities respond to disasters.

 

 

Comments | Topics: AmeriCorps, Bill Basl, Corporation for National and Community Service

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►