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July 17, 2012 at 10:07 AM

A Washington state apple that doesn’t turn brown

Corrected version

Who wouldn’t want an apple that won’t turn brown when sliced or bruised?

Well, the U.S. Apple Commission and the  Northwest Horticultural Council, that’s who, according to a story in The New York Times by Andrew Pollack.

Okanagan Specialty Fruits in Summerland, B.C.,  says its genetically engineered, non-browning “Arctic apple” will be a hit,  in part, by making sliced apples more attractive to serve or sell.

While the U.S. Apple Commission, which represents the American apple industry, says it has no problem with genetically engineered food, the apple could hurt the apple’s image as a “healthy and natural food.”

And the Northwest Horticultural Council, representing the tree-fruit industry in Washington state and environs,  says it isn’t the time for such an apple on fruit stands, but the article doesn’t say why the council has taken that stand.

For its part, Okanagan Specialty Fruits owner Neal Carter says that sometimes, a person doesn’t want an entire apple, so a nice, nonbrown slice of apple is just what the doctor ordered.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is  expected to open a 60-day public comment period Friday on the Okanagan’s application for regulatory approval of the genetically modified apple trees.

 

Information in this article, originally published July 17, 2010, has been corrected. A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Okanagan Specialty Fruits was based in Eastern Washington. The company is based in Summerland, B.C.

Comments | More in Business/Technology, General news | Topics: apples, genetically engineered, Okanagan

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