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April 29, 2013 at 9:55 AM

22-year sentence in stabbing death of Bitter Lake man

A Lake Stevens man has been sentenced to nearly 22 years in prison for the stabbing death of a 70-year-old man in December 2011 at a senior independent-living center in Seattle’s Bitter Lake neighborhood.

Charles Jungbluth had earlier pleaded guilty to first-degree murder in the slaying of Francis “Patrick” Fleming, who was found dead inside his apartment at the Four Freedoms House on Dec. 8, 2011. He had suffered stab wounds all over his body and a deep gash to the throat, according to police.

Jungbluth, 51, was one of three people involved in the slaying and robbery of Fleming, according to police and prosecutors.

Gilda Ramirez, who was originally charged with murder, pleaded guilty to first-degree counts of robbery, burglary and trafficking in stolen property in exchange for her cooperation in the case, according to the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office. Earlier this month, a King County jury convicted Brenda Nicholas, 46, of first-degree murder for her role.

Fleming got to know the defendants, believing they were related to a neighbor at the Four Freedoms House, prosecutors said in court documents. People closest to Fleming said he was extremely friendly and often talked about his nearly 40-year-old coin collection.

It was his eagerness to chat about the coins that drew the attention of the three defendants, authorities said.

After Fleming’s slaying, police and prosecutors were soon led to the trio by a former resident at the Four Freedoms House, a woman who said she had been scammed by them, according to Seattle police. She had moved from the complex before Fleming’s murder.

Seattle police wrote in charging documents that Jungbluth’s DNA was found at the crime scene.

0 Comments | More in The Blotter | Topics: homicide, King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office, Seattle Police Department

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