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October 10, 2013 at 11:59 AM

UW football team has 2nd highest graduation rate in Pac-12

The University of Washington football team has a combined grade-point average of 2.78, and 74 percent of Husky football players graduate from college within six years — the second-highest in the PAC-12, UW athletic officials reported Thursday.

The university spends $1.6 million annually in academic support and teaching life skills to the 650 student athletes at the university.

The numbers were part of an annual report delivered to the UW Board of Regents Thursday by athletic director Scott Woodward and Kim Durand, the associate athletic director for student development.

The school with the highest graduation rate in the PAC-12 is Stanford, with a 90 percent rate. The lowest is the University of California at Berkeley, with a 48 percent graduation rate.

The UW men’s basketball team has a 78 percent graduation rate.

Among men’s sports, the sports with the lowest graduation rates were baseball, with 67 percent, and soccer, with 64 percent. Durand said that’s because many baseball and soccer student-athletes leave college early because they’re offered professional contracts in their sports.

Women athletes did considerably better. The women’s sports with the lowest graduation rates were track and field, with an 88 percent rate, and tennis, with an 86 percent rate.

The six-year graduation rate of all student-athletes is 81 percent, which is the same as the overall graduation rate for all undergraduate students, Durand said.

She said that a large number of student athletes come to the UW with undiagnosed learning disabilities. The UW uses 15 full-time staff and 90 tutors to help student-athletes in their academic classes.

“The most important work, in my opinion, is fixing what we inherited, playing catchup,” Woodward said.

Comments | More in Education | Topics: football, grade point averages, graduate rate

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