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Your guide to the latest news from around the Northwest

November 27, 2013 at 10:34 AM

Dental records fail to ID cut-up body found by dog

Investigators have been unable to determine the identity of the woman whose remains were found earlier this month on the Nisqually Indian Reservation.

Thurston County Coroner Gary Warnock said dental remains have been reviewed and compared to known missing women by a forensic dental expert at the King County Medical’s Office. However, the results were negative.

Warnock said that, for now, those tests were the last best hope to identify the woman.

While Warnock said he can’t say for sure how the woman died, the case is being investigated as a homicide based mostly on the fact that the body had been cut up with some sort of hand tool, likely a saw of some kind, Warnock said.

The remains came to light on Nov. 5, when a dog owned by Bill Flowers, a 93-year-old man who lives on the reservation, brought home a human leg. Police said Flowers buried the leg.

“He really wasn’t sure what to do, he didn’t want to get into trouble,” said Detective Sgt. Ray Brady of the Thurston County Sheriff’s Office..

Four days later, his daughter called police and alerted them to the grisly find.

The sheriff’s office launched a search that turned up portions of both arms, most of the skull, the pelvis and rib cage.

Comments | More in The Blotter | Topics: death investigation, Nisqually Indian Reservation, Thurston County Sheriff's Office


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