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December 11, 2013 at 5:25 PM

Shorter sentence denied for inmate convicted of 2001 Everett murder

Heimann

Jerry Dean Heimann

The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Gov. Jay Inslee has denied a recommendation from the state’s clemency board to grant a shortened sentence to a woman who is in the midst of a 22-year sentence for her role in a deadly group attack on a 64-year-old man that occurred when she was 14.

Inslee’s attorney, Nicholas Brown, sent Marriam Oliver’s attorney a letter last week explaining his reasoning behind the decision. In September, the state’s Clemency and Pardons Board unanimously voted that Oliver, now 26, should be released in three years, as long as she doesn’t have any infractions on her prison record during that time.

Oliver was one of five teens and an adult, Barbara Marie Opel, who either pleaded guilty or were convicted in the 2001 beating and stabbing death of Jerry Dean Heimann at his Everett home.

Opel was hired by Heimann as a caregiver to his elderly mother, and recruited her own 13-year-old daughter and other teens, including Oliver, to kill him so she could get control of his bank account.

Barbara Opel was sentenced in 2003 to life in prison without parole. Her daughter, Heather, is serving a 22-year sentence. Heather Opel’s boyfriend, Jeff Grote, was 17 at the time of the crime and pleaded guilty to first-degree murder in Heimann’s death. He is serving a 50-year sentence.

Kyle Boston, 14 at the time of the slaying, was sentenced to 18 years behind bars after pleading guilty to second-degree murder.

Boston’s cousin from Marysville, then 13, was convicted of first-and second-degree murder in juvenile court in 2001 and has since been released. In Washington, youths sentenced in juvenile court cannot be imprisoned past the age of 21.

0 Comments | More in The Blotter | Topics: Barbara Opel, Clemency and Pardons Board, Jay Inslee

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