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December 2, 2013 at 1:18 PM

‘Tuba Man’ killer jailed in Seattle drug sting

One of the three people convicted as teens in the 2008 slaying of Ed “Tuba Man” McMichael is in trouble again.

In fact, all three are now behind bars.

Kenneth Kelly, 20, was arrested last night on a drug charge in the park next to the King County Courthouse during a police operation, Seattle police Sgt. Sean Whitcomb said today. Kelly was spotted selling crack cocaine and was taken into custody, according to Whitcomb.

Kelly had “a small amount of crack and a little over $200″ in his possession, Whitcomb said.

He has not been charged.

Kelly had recently been released from prison following a conviction last year for unlawful possession of a firearm, according to court records.

Kelly, who was 15 at the time, and Billy Chambers and Ja’Mari Jones, both 16, pleaded guilty April 3, 1999, to first-degree manslaughter in the death of 53-year-old McMichael, who was beaten Oct. 25, 2008, during a robbery near Seattle Center and later died of his injuries.

McMichael was known for playing his tuba outside Seattle sporting events and Seattle Opera performances.

Chambers and Jones, who also pleaded guilty to an unrelated robbery that same night, were sentenced in King County Juvenile Court to up to 72 weeks in detention. Kelly was sentenced to up to 36 weeks. They were given credit for about 24 weeks they had already spent in custody.

Chambers has been in trouble numerous times since he was released from juvenile detention in the McMichael slaying. He was sentenced to six years in federal prison earlier this year on a firearms charge.

Jones is currently being held in the King County Jail in lieu of $5 million on a second-degree murder charge in connection with a  fatal shooting nearly a year ago at a Bellevue bar.

0 Comments | More in The Blotter | Topics: homicide, illegal firearms charge, Tuba Man

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