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February 6, 2014 at 4:20 PM

U.S. expands Tulalip Tribes’ ability to prosecute non-Indians

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — The Tulalip Tribes will soon be able to prosecute non-Indians for a limited set of crimes.

Tribes lack criminal jurisdiction over non-Indians on their reservations under a 1978 U.S. Supreme Court ruling. But the 2013 reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act allows tribes to bring cases against non-Indians for domestic-violence crimes and violations of protection orders.

U.S. justice officials announced Thursday that the Tulalip Tribes, the Pascua Yaqui Tribe in Arizona,  and the Confederation Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon have met requirements to implement provisions of the law starting Feb. 20.

The implementation date for most tribes is March 2015.

Meanwhile, federal justice officials have launched an online resource and training center to respond to sexual assaults in Indian Country.

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