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June 19, 2014 at 1:18 PM

Seattle school zones to get speed humps

The Seattle Department of Transportation has laid black tubes on the streets to measure traffic at 60 schools this month, and the city will soon build speed humps at four schools, as part of the city’s ongoing campaign to reduce the risk of children being hit by cars.

Speed humps are like speed bumps, but wider and less abrupt. They slow cars rather than forcing them to a virtual stop.  Some are scattered throughout the city, for example on 16th Avenue Southwest approaching South Seattle College.

As of last year, there were 270 humps and similar pavement mounds in the city, and another 10 raised crosswalks.

A speed hump at Graham Hill Elementary in southeast Seattle. (SDOT photo)

A speed hump at Graham Hill Elementary in southeast Seattle. (SDOT photo)

According to the SDOT Blog, more humps will be installed at:

  • Northeast 130th Street near Olympic Hills Elementary.
  • Northeast 80th Street near Thornton Creek School.
  • 30th Avenue Northeast near Eckstein Middle School.
  • 30th Avenue Southwest, near Roxhill Elementary and Explorer Middle School.

Jim Curtin, the city’s pedestrian-safety director, said traffic volumes and speeds at the 60 schools will be measured each spring and fall, to get a clearer picture of which methods work or don’t, in calming traffic.

A Seattle Times story this week told of a motorist on Greenwood Avenue North who beat a $189 speed-camera fine at Broadview-Thomson school by arguing that a warning sign was too wordy. SDOT says its blog announcement is a coincidence.  Previously, the city announced that five more elementary schools are getting speed-enforcement cameras this summer, raising the total to nine schools.

Comments | Topics: school zones, Seattle Department of Transportation, speed humps

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