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November 10, 2014 at 3:00 PM

Official says survey shows concern over Seattle becoming white, wealthy city

Discussing the results of a city survey on racial equity, Seattle’s Office of Civil Rights Director Patricia Lally said Monday, “Many respondents are concerned that Seattle is becoming a white, wealthy city, inaccessible to the diverse populations who helped build it.”

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, front, with Office of Civil Rights Director Patricia Lally, far right (Credit: Greg Gilbert / The Seattle Times)

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, front, with Office of Civil Rights Director Patricia Lally, far right (Credit: Greg Gilbert / The Seattle Times)

Lally was telling the City Council what her office has done in 2014 to advance Seattle’s Race and Social Justice Initiative.

The survey, conducted last year and released earlier this year, included a random landline and cell phone survey of 400 residents and an Internet survey of 3,127 people, including some contacted through outreach to homeless shelters, community centers and libraries and through ads.

Detailed results can be viewed here.

Highlights include:

  • 90 percent of phone respondents and 95 percent of web respondents said addressing racial equity gaps should be a “somewhat of a priority” or a “high priority” for government;
  • 60 percent of white Internet respondents somewhat or strongly agreed that Seattle is making progress at eliminating racial inequity, compared with 41 percent of black Internet respondents;
  • 31 percent of black Internet respondents strongly disagreed with the same statement;
  • 60 percent of black Internet respondents said they had “only a little” or “just some” confidence in police officers doing a good job, compared to 43 percent of white Internet respondents;
  • 66 percent of white Internet respondents rated Seattle’s economic opportunities as “good” or “very good,” compared with 56 percent of non-white Internet respondents;
  • 78 percent of phone respondents and 90 percent of Internet respondents rated housing affordability in Seattle as “poor” or “only fair”;
  • When asked “What is the most important issue facing your community today,” 11 percent of phone respondents and 17 percent of Internet respondents mentioned affordable housing;
  • When asked to rate Seattle’s public transportation, about 10 percent of respondents answered “very good,” 38 percent “good,” 39 percent “only fair” and 13 percent “poor”;
  • 50 percent of respondents rated Seattle Public Schools as “good” or “very good”.

 

Comments | Topics: Seattle City Council, Seattle Office of Civil Rights, Seattle Race and Social Justice Initiative

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