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The Today File

Your guide to the latest news from around the Northwest

January 5, 2015 at 6:03 AM

Heavy rain causes landslides, flooding and road closures in W. Washington

Deana Zimmerman and her dog Buttercup, of Federal Way, watch the Snoqualmie River flood due to heavy rain Monday, Jan. 5, 2015. "It is magnificent," said Deana Zimmerman. Crowds watched the river swell near Puget Sound Energy's Snoqualmie Falls Hydroelectric Project. At around 1 p.m. the river was running about 21-feet-deep and around 38,000 cubic-feet-per-second, said Scott Lichtenberg, plant manager. PSE closed the boardwalk to the waterfall just after 1 p.m. to ensure public safety. (Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times)

Deana Zimmerman and her dog Buttercup, of Federal Way, watch the Snoqualmie River flood due to heavy rain Monday. “It is magnificent,” said Zimmerman. (Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times)

The Associated Press and staff reports

UPDATE, 1:50 p.m. | The Snohomish County Sheriff reports several roads closed due to flooding: 118th Drive Southeast is closed from Three Lakes Road to the end; Norman Road is closed from Marine Drive to Miller Road; Boe Road is closed from Atone Drive to the end and Old Owen Road is closed from Sultan City limits to Reiner Road due to trees in power lines, according to tweets.

UPDATE, 10:20 a.m. | Torrential rain caused landslides and flooding, including in one neighborhood in Hoquiam where water washed out the foundations of three homes, threatened others and forced the evacuation of about 60 nursing home residents, authorities said.

Police urged residents to leave their homes along an eight-block stretch of Queets Avenue at the base of Beacon Hill because of the danger that the whole bluff could give way, Police Chief Jeff Meyers said Monday.

There was no exact number of evacuations, and no injuries have been reported. The nursing home was evacuated as a precaution, he said.

UPDATE, 8:16 a.m. | The Snoqualmie River has reached Phase IV flood levels.

According to the King County Flood Warning Center, major flooding is expected. The worst flooding areas include, Woodinville-Duvall Road, Highway 203, between Duvall and Carnation, Moon Valley Road, South Fork Road, Fall City-Carnation Road, Tolt Hill Road and Northeast 124th Street.

A flooded Snoqualmie River rushes over the falls after heavy rains in Snoqualmie, Washington Monday, Jan. 5, 2014. Video by Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times

UPDATE, 7:35 a.m. | Heavy rains and several accidents have caused slowdowns across the area, according to the WSDOT. The Everett to Seattle commute is at 95 minutes and Everett to Bellevue is 90 minutes. Federal Way to Bellevue is 85 minutes, Federal Way to Seattle is 65 and federal Way to SeaTac is 35 minutes.

Several roads throughout Western Washington are closed due to flooding, including: Highway 101, U.S. 12, 107, 109,  105 and Sate Route 4. The WSDOT has more information here.

UPDATE, 6:55 a.m. | Overnight rains have pushed the Tolt River to a Phase IV flood alert with major flooding possible, according to a news release from the King County Flood Warning Center.

Levees may overtop near Carnation and water could cover Tolt River Road Northeast in the vicinity of San Souci.

Water roars over Snoqualmie Falls on Monday morning. (Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times)

Water roars over Snoqualmie Falls on Monday morning. (Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times)

The Snoqualmie River remains at a Phase III flood alert level, according to the Flood Warning Center. Widespread flooding could be expected along many stretches of the Snoqualmie River. Floodwaters could reach several roads, including the Fall City-Carnation Road, Tolt Hill Road and Northeast 124th Street.

UPDATE, 6:22 a.m. | Puget Sound Energy reports about 1,000 customers are without power Monday morning. Downed trees have caused outages in Sammamish and Carnation, according to the PSE website.

No outages were reported by Seattle City Light.

UPDATED, 6:10 a.m. | A weekend storm blasted parts of Western Washington with torrential rain, causing landslides and flooding. It also caused heavy snow in the mountains and parts of Eastern Washington.

The National Weather Service says 4 to 9 inches of rain fell on the southwest slopes of the Olympics and 2 to 5 inches on the west slopes of the Cascades with another inch or 2 expected Monday.

Eastlake High School and Inglewood High School are starting two hours late due to a power outage.

The Transportation Department reported four landslides in the Aberdeen-Hoquiam area closing highways.

The Weather Service issued flood warnings on the Stillaguamish, Snoqualmie and Newaukum rivers and a flood watch for many other Western Washington rivers.

Heavy snow continued Monday in the mountains and higher Eastern Washington elevations, but turned to rain at Spokane.

Forecasters say rains will ease Tuesday with mild temperatures statewide.

It’s raining on Snoqualmie Pass with areas of gusty winds, according to the Washington State Department of Transportation. The roadway is bare and wet.

Stevens Pass reports compact snow and ice. Chains are required on all vehicles except those with all-wheel drive, Oversize vehicles are prohibited.

Traction tires are advised on White Pass. The road is bare and wet with ice in places.

Related: Snoqualmie issues evacuation notices for downtown neighborhood

Hoquiam road blocked, neighborhood evacuated due to landslide danger

Flooding, slides slow rail traffic

Photos: Flooding in Western Washington

Standing water  in a parking lot from an all night rainstorm reflects downtown Seattle across Denny Way. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)

Standing water in a parking lot reflects downtown Seattle across Denny Way. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)

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