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UW Election Eye 2012

Campaign 2012 through the eyes of UW faculty and students

March 3, 2012 at 11:59 AM

Family values and memories of Reagan strike a chord with voters in Bremerton

Caucus goers in Bremerton, WA

Caucus goers in Bremerton, WA at the West Sound Technical Skills Center (Photo by Lindsey Meeks/UW Election Eye)

BREMERTON — Here is something I didn’t expect to hear at a Republican caucus at the West Sound Technical Skills Center in Bremerton: “It’s a good thing [Barack] Obama was elected.”

This unexpected statement was uttered by kindergarten teacher and long-time Bremerton resident, Veronica Moore. Moore quickly added, “Because now people are awake.”

Moore, who is originally from Florida, has not always been involved in politics. When she became a mom, her children took precedence. A proud mom of four, she said she had to do something to get involved for the sake of her children and the youth of America. “Too many children come from broken homes, and we need strong families,” she said. That is why she is supporting Rick Santorum, for his “strong family values.”

Caucus goers in Bremerton, WA

Caucus participants at West Sound Technical Skills Center in Bremerton (Photo by Lindsey Meeks / UW Election Eye)

She also supports Santorum’s record. Her father was in the military and used to say, “You can’t judge someone by what they say, but by what they have done, their record.” She continued, “If someone wants to see what kind of teacher I am, they can look at my record and decide.”

Trent England, the pooled caucus leader, was also driven to the caucuses because of family values. Before voters divided into their precinct discussions, he told the crowd of about 200 that he had three reasons for being here; he then asked his three children — Lydia, Abraham, and Rachael — to stand up. He said, “We’re here to make sure our nation stays free and prosperous,” and coming to the caucus is an “expression of our liberty.”

He told a story about his time as a house parent for college interns in Washington D.C. He said an intern from Jordan told him that they had a hidden radio, built into the furniture, in her house. And that in November 1984, when the intern and her family heard the election returns rolling in, they knew that if Ronald Reagan was reelected, that everything would be okay. The crowd cheered when England concluded his comments.

The caucus started off with the unexpected comment about Obama, but the Reagan story, and the emotions it struck, we’re right on cue.

Comments | Topics: Barack Obama, Caucuses, Family

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