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UW Election Eye 2012

Campaign 2012 through the eyes of UW faculty and students

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You are currently viewing all posts written by Derek Walker. Derek Walker is a graduate student in the Master of Communication in Digital Media (MCDM) program at the UW Communication Department. He works as a videographer, content producer and interactive media designer. As a multimedia story teller, Derek is excited to delve into the realm of political discourse.

April 25, 2012 at 11:40 AM

Up from the ashes: the National September 11 Memorial and the debate on homeland security

Just outside the spacious 9/11 Memorial site Tuesday afternoon, our UW Election Eye team asked a few people who they trust more to keep America safe — President Obama or likely GOP nominee Mitt Romney.

NEW YORK CITY — Stepping onto Ground Zero in Lower Manhattan is an overwhelming and incredibly sad sensation. As a first time visitor to New York, and with no discernible connection to the tragic events that day, I had forgotten how the site of the burning buildings had riled up feelings of fear and anger in me. The beautiful fountains, each adorned with the names of the victims and heroes killed that day, stand as not-so-gentle reminders of the towering buildings that once seemingly touched the edge of the sun. Those memories and emotions suddenly came pouring back.

The names of those fallen adorn the fountains at the National September 11 Memorial on April 24, 2012. (Photo by Derek Walker/UW Election Eye)

The names of those fallen adorn the fountains at the National September 11 Memorial on April 24, 2012. (Photo by Derek Walker/UW Election Eye)

The National September 11 Memorial stands as a tribute to the 2,983 men, women, and children who died in the terrorist attacks more than 10 years ago. While construction of the World Trade Center projects continues, the Memorial operates in a limited, yet awe inspiring fashion.

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Comments | More in National | Topics: 9/11 Memorial, Ground Zero, Manhattan

April 19, 2012 at 11:30 AM

Potential of increased coal train traffic through Western Washington has residents concerned for their homes and the environment

A proposal that would allow millions of tons of coal from Montana and Wyoming in uncovered train cars has some Vancouver, WA residents worried about environmental degradation caused by coal dust.

Alistair & Winston, two Old English Sheepdogs that live in Columbia Grove with owners Sandy and Erskine Wood. (Photo by Derek Walker/UW Election Eye)

Alistair & Winston, two Old English Sheepdogs that live in Columbia Grove with owners Sandy and Erskine Wood. (Photo by Derek Walker/UW Election Eye)

VANCOUVER, Wash. — Meet Alistair and Winston, two beautiful Old English Sheepdogs that, along with owners Sandy and Erskine Wood, live in Columbia Grove, a gorgeous property located along the banks of the Columbia River. Situated among 200 to 300 year-old Western Red Cedar trees, this ecological wonderland, complete with lush gardens and spring-fed creeks and ponds, is a virtual utopia for two lucky dogs who romp, play, and sniff to their hearts’ content.

But this puppy-paradise could be upended should major coal companies be allowed to transport millions of tons of coal across Western Washington railway tracks like the ones that run next to Columbia Grove. Proposals have been put forth that would allow more than 100 million tons of coal to enter the state of Washington from Montana and Wyoming and make its way to ports along the Puget Sound and Columbia River through the Columbia Gorge. Once there, the coal would be shipped overseas to China and other coal burning countries.

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Comments | More in State | Topics: coal, coal dust, coal trains