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UW Election Eye 2012

Campaign 2012 through the eyes of UW faculty and students

Topic: conservatives

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November 3, 2012 at 7:00 AM

In Seattle, conservative voters an ideological minority

Kyle Curtis peers over the sign that often brings him disapproving looks from liberal onlookers. Credit: Lauren LeMieux / UW Election Eye.

SEATTLE — For Kyle Curtis, president of the University of Washington College Republicans, it is nearly impossible to show  support for his chosen presidential candidate.

“I can’t tell you how hard it is to get a Mitt Romney sign in this state,” Curtis said.

Curtis did find a sign, but he also found confrontation. While holding the blue-and-red Mitt Romney poster on campus he got a disproving reaction from a passerby.

“He glared at us, then he took a few steps back,” Curtis said. “He was like, ‘You’re kidding me. You’re actually going to vote for Mitt Romney?’ and then I was like ‘Yes.’”

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Comments | More in Culture, Local, State | Topics: blue voters, conservatives, Republicans

May 2, 2012 at 11:30 AM

Conservative poet preaches liberty, freedom

A die-hard conservative finds his activism niche through writing and distributing patriotic poetry.

Roger W. Hancock was not a founding father. You might be confusing him with two men with their signatures on the Declaration of Independence, Roger Sherman and John Hancock, a confusion the real Roger W. Hancock is quick to clarify.

Roger W. Hancock is the PoetPatriot, a man I met at the King County Republican Convention last weekend, and a unique character among many in this election year.

He’s hard to not run into at a Republican Convention. Ever since becoming a Republican in 1988, he’s been a Precinct Committee Officer and has been to every convention since. His pin-laden, American flag waving hat sticks out from the masses, and you couldn’t even get in the door without getting a sheet with his poems on it.

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Comments | More in Culture, Local | Topics: conservatives, Election 2012, Republicans

April 16, 2012 at 11:30 AM

A toss-up district: Welcome to the Eastside’s contested 45th legislative district

With Democrats on a downward trend in the 45th legislative district, it doesn’t help that redistricting has made it slightly more right-leaning, according to all the candidates currently running.

45th LD, representative pos. 1 candidates

From left to right: Jacob Bond (D), Rep. Roger Goodman (D), Joel Hussey (R) (Photos courtesy of vote4bond.com, leg.wa.gov, Joel Hussey / UW Election Eye)

KIRKLAND — In 2010, incumbent Rep. Roger Goodman (D) narrowly won re-election in the 45th LD against Republican challenger Kevin Haistings with 2.65% of the vote, or only 1,511 votes. Goodman was slated to run for Congress in the 1st district, the seat Jay Inslee is vacating. But with such a crowded field, and challenges with fundraising, he is now seeking re-election for his post in the 45th LD

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Comments | More in Local | Topics: Conservative, conservatives, Democrats

April 16, 2012 at 11:30 AM

A toss-up district: Welcome to the Eastside's contested 45th legislative district

With Democrats on a downward trend in the 45th legislative district, it doesn’t help that redistricting has made it slightly more right-leaning, according to all the candidates currently running.

45th LD, representative pos. 1 candidates

From left to right: Jacob Bond (D), Rep. Roger Goodman (D), Joel Hussey (R) (Photos courtesy of vote4bond.com, leg.wa.gov, Joel Hussey / UW Election Eye)

KIRKLAND — In 2010, incumbent Rep. Roger Goodman (D) narrowly won re-election in the 45th LD against Republican challenger Kevin Haistings with 2.65% of the vote, or only 1,511 votes. Goodman was slated to run for Congress in the 1st district, the seat Jay Inslee is vacating. But with such a crowded field, and challenges with fundraising, he is now seeking re-election for his post in the 45th LD

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Comments | More in Local | Topics: Conservative, conservatives, Democrats

April 8, 2012 at 7:00 AM

Proponents of Referendum 74, on same-sex marriage, looking to impact law AND the governor's race

In the state’s gubernatorial contest this year, it’s not just about who is on the ballot. Perhaps just as important is what else may be on the ballot.

A voter in Mt. Vernon, Wash., signs a petition during February's GOP caucus (Photo by Alex Stonehill / UW Election Eye).

Case in point: Referendum 74.

R-74 is being pursued by Preserve Marriage Washington to block Senate Bill No. 6329, which legalizes same-sex marriage. This bill passed the state legislature in February, was signed by Gov. Christine Gregoire, and is scheduled to go into effect June 7, but would be delayed if enough signatures are gathered to put R-74 on the November ballot. If R-74 makes the ballot, the outcome of its vote would determine the law’s fate.

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Comments | More in State | Topics: conservatives, GLBT, marriage equality

April 8, 2012 at 7:00 AM

Proponents of Referendum 74, on same-sex marriage, looking to impact law AND the governor’s race

In the state’s gubernatorial contest this year, it’s not just about who is on the ballot. Perhaps just as important is what else may be on the ballot.

A voter in Mt. Vernon, Wash., signs a petition during February's GOP caucus (Photo by Alex Stonehill / UW Election Eye).

Case in point: Referendum 74.

R-74 is being pursued by Preserve Marriage Washington to block Senate Bill No. 6329, which legalizes same-sex marriage. This bill passed the state legislature in February, was signed by Gov. Christine Gregoire, and is scheduled to go into effect June 7, but would be delayed if enough signatures are gathered to put R-74 on the November ballot. If R-74 makes the ballot, the outcome of its vote would determine the law’s fate.

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Comments | More in State | Topics: conservatives, GLBT, marriage equality

April 3, 2012 at 7:28 AM

With Jay Inslee moving on, newly redrawn First Congressional District boasts fierce competition

The newly redistricted 1st CD stretches from the Canadian border to Medina.

The newly redistricted 1st Congressional District stretches from the Canadian border to Medina. (Courtesy of redistricting.wa)

Update, April 12: Roger Goodman has withdrawn from 1st CD race, making the Democratic competition slightly less crowded. He will instead run for re-election to his old seat in the 46th LD.

Only three months in and 2012 is shaping up to be a year of political intensity, and not just for the presidential candidates. Washington state’s recently finalized redistricting of congressional districts has set the stage for a fierce competition, but it’s not where one might expect.

Thanks to the 2010 US Census results, the Evergreen State gained a coveted prize — another seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. This representative will herald from the state’s newly established 10th Congressional District, smack in the middle of Pierce County and centered around Olympia. One would think this new political arena would be the talk of the town and swarming with legislative hopefuls. But as of now the 10th is home to only three announced candidates, Democrat Denny Heck and Republicans Stan Flemming and Dick Muri.

Meanwhile, it is the no-longer-recognizable 1st Congressional District that’s heating up with competition. The Redistricting Committee has redrawn the 1st’s geographical and political lines. What used to be a compact “water district” of mostly King and Kitsap counties is now a sprawling beast, stretching from Medina to the Canadian border and incorporating everything from the UW-Bothell campus to rural farmland in Lynden. Of the District’s 672,000-plus population, over half are transplants from different jurisdictions.

The adjusted territory has dramatically altered the district’s political leanings. The former 1st was solidly Democratic, but the new boundaries include Republican strongholds, like conservative Whatcom County. That, coupled with former Democratic 1st CD Rep. Jay Inslee’s resignation from Congress to run for Governor makes this CD a new ballgame.

And people are lining up to run: six Democrats, an Independent and a Republican. With eight people vying for one spot, it’s essential to know the players.

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Comments | More in State | Topics: conservatives, Darcy Burner, Darshan Rauniyar

March 27, 2012 at 6:30 AM

Republican delegate convention in Pierce County messy, long, and favored Rick Santorum

Republican presidential candidates Ron Paul, Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich, and Rick Santorum (Photos courtesy of www.ronpaul2012.com, mittromney.com, newt.org, and ricksantorum.com)

Note: this is the second of two related posts on the state of the 2012 Republican presidential contest. Part 1 was posted yesterday morning.

TACOMA — The Republican presidential nomination is not over yet, Rick Santorum says. Part of his campaign’s argument is that delegates in caucus states will be allocated to him in greater numbers than the popular votes were on caucus day.

The Pierce County Republican Party convention on Saturday is one place to test Santorum’s view.

The results suggest Santorum might be right.

On March 3, Mitt Romney handily won Washington state’s presidential straw poll at the GOP caucuses, garnering 38% of the statewide caucus vote to 25% for Ron Paul and 24% for Santorum. In Pierce County specifically, Romney won 38% of the vote, Santorum won 26% and Paul received 23%.

That was the popular straw vote on caucus day. In Washington, as in many other caucus states, the official process of appropriating delegates to candidates begins at the precinct caucuses — but is entirely separate from the straw vote — and then moves to the county, and finally to the state level.

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Comments | Topics: conservatives, delegates, GOP

March 14, 2012 at 5:30 AM

Romney's problems with evangelicals doomed him in Alabama and Mississippi, will likely continue

Rick Santorum is Roman Catholic. This is not news: he is far from shy about his Catholicism. More generally, he is as outspoken about religious faith as any major presidential candidate who’s had success has ever been.

Santorum swept Republican presidential primaries in Alabama and Mississippi last night. This is no small matter. Catholics don’t win GOP primaries often, and certainly not in the South, where evangelicals make up large percentages of the Republican electorate. Among yesterday’s voters, 74% in Alabama self-identified as evangelical, and 80% in Mississippi self-identified as evangelical.

I study religion and politics in America. I find it almost impossible to believe that Santorum would be winning Republican primaries in the South were his central rival for the nomination, Mitt Romney, not Mormon in religious faith.

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Comments | Topics: advertising, Alabama, Caucuses

March 10, 2012 at 6:30 AM

Thousands at Ada County caucus make history, embrace 2012, put Idaho on Republican map

BOISE — “Wow, all the way from Seattle? I knew we were a big deal!” said one Republican at the Ada County caucus. That’s the reaction we heard covering the caucuses this past week from Sandpoint all the way down to Boise, Idaho. Our 1,400 mile trip showed us that not only were Republicans energetic about…

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Comments | Topics: caucus, Caucuses, caucuses

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