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UW Election Eye 2012

Campaign 2012 through the eyes of UW faculty and students

Topic: Endorsements

You are viewing the most recent posts on this topic.

April 13, 2012 at 6:30 AM

What is Bobby Virk running for anyway? (And who’s paying for it?)

(Illustration by Lucas Anderson / UW Election Eye)

Democratic candidates have been juggling positions in South Seattle legislative races in a dizzying game of political musical chairs. But don’t worry, we think they’ve finally got it all figured out.

It looks like South Seattle’s diverse 11th Legislative District is going to continue its streak of diverse representatives. Democrats Bobby Virk, a dentist who immigrated from India, and Rob Holland, an African American who currently serves as Port Commissioner, are leading the charge in the race for State House.

Virk, a newer face on the political scene but not a shy one, clearly wants a job in Olympia. But he can’t seem to decide exactly which one. He began his candidacy in his old district, the 47th, which his website bio and his twitter account still reference.

But after being districted out of the 47th — candidates have to reside in the district they represent — Virk put in his candidacy for the 11th district Senate seat, which was vacated by retiring Sen. Margarita Prentice. A press release and another Facebook page later, Prentice endorsed his campaign and his new candidacy was off and running.

But then came Rep. Bob Hasegawa, who announced he was leaving his post in the house to run for the 11th district Senate seat as well.

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Comments | More in State | Topics: 11th LD, Bobby Virk, Campaign Finance

April 12, 2012 at 6:30 AM

Storify: State GOP and Dem officials throw down in Twitter battle

In a Twitter fight Tuesday, Benton Strong of the Wash. Democrats and Josh Amato of the Wash. Republicans slung tweets about the costs of a special election to replace Inslee. The fight reflects the partisan brawl about these costs, as well as how communications directors spend their free time.

Continue after the jump to view the full story — tweets and all.

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Comments | Topics: Benton Strong, Campaign Finance, campaign oddities

April 4, 2012 at 6:30 AM

Mitt Romney faces battle on two fronts — Barack Obama launches general election, yet Rick Santorum fights on

Signs, signs everywhere a sign.

On Tuesday the signs all suggested that the Republican presidential primary was over, done, finito, and that Mitt Romney and Barack Obama were ready to rumble. Someone needs to tell Rick Santorum, though, because he was defiant in defeat.

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Comments | More in National | Topics: Associated Press, Barack Obama, budget

March 17, 2012 at 6:26 AM

If Lehigh and Norfolk State can do it in the NCAA tournament, can Rick Santorum upend the Republican presidential contest?

For sports fans, this time of the year is known as March Madness. That’s the popular name ascribed to the NCAA men’s and women’s basketball tournaments, in which small schools, serious underdogs, sometimes defeat bigger, far wealthier, steeped-in-tradition programs.

March Madness is the official name of the NCAA basketball tournament (logo by NCAA).

It happened four times yesterday.

Two teams that are #15 seeds (among the lowest in the tournament), Norfolk State and Lehigh, upset #2 seeds and hoop icons Missouri and Duke, respectively. In the history of the NCAA men’s tourney, only four #15 seeds had beaten #2 seeds. It happened twice yesterday.

Further, a #13 seed, Ohio University, upset one of the legendary sports programs in the nation, University of Michigan.  And a #12 seed, University of South Florida, knocked off a #5, Temple.

It was quite a day. Personally, I’m a huge Michigan fan — but I found myself caught up in rooting for the underdog Ohio U. Watching David knock off Goliath is something special.

There are favorites and underdogs in politics, too. And right now, the underdog has got a shot in the Republican Party presidential primary. It’s a long, long, long shot — but it’s still a chance. And when there is a chance, sometimes things happen. Like in 2008.

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Comments | Topics: Alabama, Bill Clinton, Caucuses

March 6, 2012 at 5:26 PM

Exclusive: Interview with Idaho Governor Butch Otter

Idaho Governor Butch Otter chats with an attendee at pro-Mitt Romney Meet and Greet event in Coeur D'Alene on Monday, March 5.

Idaho Governor Butch Otter chats with an attendee at a Mitt Romney Meet and Greet event in Coeur D'Alene on Monday, March 5. (Photo by Ilona Idlis/UW Election Eye)

COEUR D’ALENE –The hundred or so people gathered inside the Coeur D’Alene Resort Hotel for a Mitt Romney rally greeted Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter like an old friend.

Moments after strolling inside the convention hall, the Governor got a warm hug from Donna Montgomery, an event volunteer and long time member of Kootenai County Republican Women Federated. As the two walked toward the room, the Governor’s arm around Mongomery’s shoulders, she joked that Otter should be the one running for president.

“You know, I was up there for six years and didn’t like it much,” he retorted, reflecting on his six years in Washington D.C. as a congressman.

After shaking hands with me and Alicia Halberg — the only visible press at the event — the Governor disappeared inside the meeting hall and Montgomery nudged me with her elbow.

“Isn’t he cool,” she beamed.

Clad in jeans, a dress shirt with monogrammed “Butch” cuffs, American flag cuff links, and an enormous gilded belt buckle, the Governor carried himself a bit like a cowboy. He exuded a likability reminiscent of George W. Bush’s good ol’ boy charm. Aw shucks. I found myself agreeing with Montgomery.

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Comments | Topics: Butch Otter, caucus, Caucuses

March 5, 2012 at 6:30 AM

Idaho's Turn: Closed caucus on Super Tuesday

Idaho's first ever Republican Presidential Nomination caucus will be held on Super Tuesday, March 6.

Idaho's first ever Republican Presidential Nomination caucus will be held on Super Tuesday, March 6. (Photo courtesy of idaho-republican-caucus.com)

SANDPOINT — Super Tuesday is upon us. With seven primaries, three caucuses, and 419 delegates at stake, the news media are rich with speculation. For the first time ever, the state of Idaho’s Republican Party gets to be part of the buzz.

Until this year, Idaho’s GOP determined its presidential and local nominee preferences with a primary in late May. At the presidential level, the 32 delegates chosen then attended the GOP National Convention with little allegiance to the candidates. Three quarters of the delegates were “soft pledged” (meaning they could change their minds) and the remaining 8 were simply “unpledged” — in other words, free agents.

The late season primary and the changeable delegates meant that Republican candidates rarely visited and few paid attention to the Gem State. Finally, the GOP got tired of being ignored and resolved to make its sizable number of delegates — more than Iowa, New Hampshire or Nevada — count in 2012.

So last October, they instituted a caucus system and moved the date way, way up to Super Tuesday — not an uncommon move for states who want more of an early say in the nomination process. So, on Tuesday, 44 counties will open their doors to first-time caucus goers at 7 p.m. In accordance with Idaho’s new voter identification law, only registered Republicans with valid ID can participate.

After that, it gets complicated.

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Comments | Topics: Boise, Butch Otter, caucus

February 4, 2012 at 6:56 AM

Mitt Romney's Mormon faith helps in Nevada and the West

The LDS Institute at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (Photo Elizabeth Hunter, UW Election Eye)

LAS VEGAS — A couple of undergrads were horsing around in the hallway when I entered the building.

At the Latter Day Saints Institute of Religion Student Center on the campus of University of Nevada-Las Vegas, young Mormons have heated discussions about politics over ping-pong and candy. Lots of candy. Several baskets of candy — in bowls on the front desk, on a coffee table, in the hallway.

I grabbed a piece as I asked the receptionist if I could speak to someone about Mitt Romney and Mormon politics. “LDS,” she kindly corrected me with a smile. I blushed. From that moment on, I’ve used LDS -— not Mormon —- when talking with members of the Church.

She led me to the office of Institute Director Garth Rasmussen, whom she referred to as Brother Rasmussen. The LDS Doctrine and Covenants book, labeled and marked with color-coded tags, lay open on his desk. Within minutes, Brother Rasmussen was openly sharing his gospel with me.

Here’s the thing, though: Rasmussen said he was happy to talk with me about politics, provided I knew that they were his opinions and not those of the LDS Church writ large. I said absolutely, and we started discussing political issues from healthcare to welfare. About the latter, he got particularly passionate, and shared with me a Mormon parable called the “Gullible Gulls.”

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Comments | Topics: Demographics, Endorsement, Endorsements